Corgi vs Braque Saint-Germain - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Corgi is originated from United Kingdom but Braque Saint-Germain is originated from France. Corgi may grow 32 cm / 12 inches shorter than Braque Saint-Germain. Corgi may weigh 21 kg / 46 pounds lesser than Braque Saint-Germain. Both Corgi and Braque Saint-Germain has almost same life span. Both Corgi and Braque Saint-Germain has same litter size. Both Corgi and Braque Saint-Germain requires Low maintenance.

Basic Information

Group:
Herding dogs
Sporting dog
Origin:
United Kingdom
France
Height Male:
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
56 - 62 cm
22 - 25 inches
Height Female:
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
55 - 60 cm
21 - 24 inches
Weight Male:
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
20 - 35 kg
44 - 78 pounds
Weight Female:
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
16 - 28 kg
35 - 62 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 14 Years
12 - 15 Years
Litter Size:
6 - 8
4 - 8
Size:
Small dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
Pembroke, Pem
Saint-Germain Pointer, French Pointer (Saint-Germain), Saint-Germain Pointing Dog, French Pointing Dog (Saint-Germain) Braque d’Auvergne Pointer, Auvergne Pointer, Braque du Auvergne, Auvergnese Pointer, Auvergne Pointing Dog, Auvergnian Pointer, Auvergnese Pointing Dog, Auvergnian Pointing Dog Bleu de Auvergne, Bleu d’Auvergne
Colors Available:
Red, black and tan - white markings, fawn
Dull white with orange (fawn) markings
Coat:
Short to medium length, dense
short not fine
Shedding:
Minimal
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Affectionate, Cheerful, Intelligent, Loving, Loyal, Playful, Sweet
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

Known as a cattle herding dog breed, the Corgi hails from Pembrokeshire, Wales. You get 2 breeds – the Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Welsh Corgi.

The word ‘Korgi’ actually means ‘dwarf dog’. According to some, the small dog’s history goes back as far as 1107AD, but when you start doing research, you find that the Pembroke Welsh Corgi doesn’t have a traceable breed history.

The Pembrokeshire Corgi was officially recognized by the Kennel Club in the United Kingdom in 1934 and is a breed separate from the Cardiganshire Corgi.

The Braque Saint-Germain, also known as the St. Germain Pointing Dog, is a French creation. The French pointing dogs and the English pointing dogs were mixed to develop the Braque Saint-Germain. He is a versatile hunting dog that was both a pointer and a gun dog. They are medium to large in size and went from being bred by royalty in the 1830’s to a popular everyday hunting dog. The ancestry of the breed can be traced back many additional centuries.

As popular as the Braque Saint-Germain was as a hunter, he gained his notoriety in the show ring. The first time a Braque Saint-Germain entered the ring in 1863 it was an acclaimed breed and upstaged all other pointing breeds. The French Braque Saint-Germain club was opened in 1913 and recognized by the Federation Cynoloqique International (FCI) and in 2006 was recognized by the North American United Kennel Club. Their popularity has risen and fallen since World War II. It has flirted with extinction more than once. Today’s Braque Saint-Germain is a highly talented hunting dog with a standard appearance that still does well in the ring.

The English Pointer was a cross between the hound dogs, British gundog, Spanish Pointer and herding breeds. This made the English Pointer a very versatile breed before it was crossed with the Braque Francais Gascogne. The Braque Francais Gascogne itself is believed to have developed from the Chien d-Oysel and Italian and Spanish pointing dogs. The English Pointer was specialized in pointing and the French Braque Francais Gascogne was a very versatile dog. In the Braque Saint-Germain the dog world has a versatile, excellent pointing dog.

In the 1800’s the French Crown was gifted with two English Pointers that were great at hunting. Some considered the English Pointers to be better than any of their Braque Francais. The female of these two pointers was bred many times but the male died without breeding. The female’s first litter was with a brown German Spaniel and were of low quality. Her second litter however was with an outstanding bird dog and produced 7 excellent puppies. Because of this these two dogs were bred several more times. The owner of the adult dogs moved to Saint-Germain, where their appearance attracted many hunters. The breed flourished here and was named the Braque Saint-Germain.

Soon corrupt individuals sold non-purebreds as Braque Saint-Germains and handlers showed these dogs under the Saint-Germain name. There are always dangers when a popular breed’s beginnings comes from only two dogs. In 1913 the new breed club fought over the standard and ended up producing two types. The first type was a sturdy dog with long ears and a round chest. He was larger and slower than his cousin. The second type was a smaller dog with a finer skeleton and short, high set ears. He was a galloper to his cousin’s trot.

The breed found itself facing near extinction in 1914 and during all of World War I. Dogs were not bred and many were not properly cared for. The breed became quite rare. Then as it began to recover, the Second World War intervened and devasted the breed again. By the end of the war, they were once again very rare and on the edge of extinction. It took a dedicated effort from local breeders to bring the breed back. By the 1950’s the two types of Braque Saint-Germain dogs were molded into only one breed. There remained a conflict between those that bred show dogs and those that bred hunting dogs.

Slowly the breed grew in number and in the late 1990’s there were over 100 puppies registered into the club every year. More than 100 were entered into the clubs in 2009. There have also been a few English Pointer crosses allowed to breed with the Braque Saint-Germains in order to grow and improve the gene pool. Still the breed is exceedingly rare outside of France. Through it all the breed has been able to maintain its place in confirmation and still be a versatile hunting dog.

Description

The Corgi is a small to medium sized dog, standing at 25 to 30cm and weighs between 10 to 14kg.

The coat of the Corgi is fairly short to medium length and is thick. You’ll find him to be available in colors such as red, fawn, black and tan and with white markings.

He has a sharp, intelligent face with an amicable expression. Looking much like a fox with short legs, he has a long, low-set body body and is a sturdy dog. His ears also stand erect and he has a docked tail.

The Braque Saint-Germain is very much a pointer and yet is a very attractive dog. They have a medium build, drop ears and a long, level tail tapered at the end. They are really distinctive looking with an athletic, lean, muscled look. The skull is round and the muzzle is the same length as the skull. Their nose is pink , their lips cover their lower jaw and their eyes are golden, round and large. The ears are set high on the head and look like they are slightly detached. The neck is long, muscular and arched, while they have deep chest. They are well proportioned, good looking dogs with a friendly facial expression. Their coat is true to the pointing dog group as it is short, smooth and white with orange markings. Dogs of any other color might be great hunting dogs but are not show dogs and should not be bred

Health Problems

A corgi, when he is well looked after, can live to be anything from 12 to 15 years of age. However even this sturdy dog may well be susceptible to some of the more common dog illnesses, such as hip dysplasia and degenerative myelopathy.

Also you have to be careful with your Corgi and make sure that he doesn’t gain weight as this weight gain can bring with it a host of health complications.

Hip Dysplasia:

Hip dysplasia with your Corgi is about an abnormal joint structure where the bones lose contact with each other. This parting of the bones is known as subluxation, and it is this subluxation that can cause your pet pain and discomfort and lead to osteoarthritis.

This disease isn’t reserved for old dogs either, and some young dogs can begin to show signs of this disease before they reach their first birthday. Without taking your dog to the vet and having medical intervention, your pet may eventually be unable to walk.

Degenerative Myelopathy:

It is so sad when Degenerative Myelopathy invades your pet as it is a devastating disease watching your pet become paralyzed. The disease seems to come on when then dog is between 8 and 14 years of age where your pet loses co-ordination in the hind limbs, getting worse until he can no longer walk. Often your dog can no longer control his urine output.

There are no real treatments that have stopped the progression of the disease and your vet may suggest treatments that can make your pet more comfortable You vet may compassionately suggest your dog be put down, particularly for those people who can’t afford treatment.

The breed has very few health issues even with all the cross breeding followed by inbreeding. Due to the small gene pool there might be some genetically inherited problems. Due to the size of the gene pool, they might suffer from “founder’s effect” where if one dog has a certain condition, their descendants could also. Not enough research has been done to know if this is the case with the Braque Saint-Germain of not.

Some of the potential health issues that the3 Braque Saint-Germain might face include:

  • Dysplasia of the hip and elbow.
  • Cleft Palate or Lip.
  • Ear Infections.
  • PRA or Progressive Retinal Atrophy
  • Demodex Mange/Demodectic mange
  • Epilepsy
  • Deafness
  • Aortic Stenosis
  • Acral Mutilation Syndrome

Caring The Pet

Grooming:

The Corgi isn’t a particularly heavy shedder, so a brush down twice a week will be excellent for his thick coat. And of coarse he will thrive on the attention given to him during the brushing session.

Exercise:

Corgis love walks and sniffing around as they go along. They’re energetic dogs so you’ll need to include him in your daily walks which he just loves, and include him in some ball games.

Diet:

Corgis may be short in stature but they are robust dogs – sturdily built. They are active dogs and can use up a lot of calories. They will certainly require a diet that features good quality protein.

Feed your Corgi a good quality food designed for special life stages – puppy, adult, pregnant female, senior dog and also dogs with illnesses.

Most Corgis do well having 2 meals of kibble a day. Puppies usually eat 4 meals a day until they are old enough to move onto an adult feeding schedule. Include cooked rice, meat and vegetables in his diet as well as raw meat from time to time and ensure there is always a bowl of clean, cool water available.

Feeding

This is a working dog that can run and track for miles. She needs good nutrition. Feed about 3 cups per day in one or two meals. Two meals are preferred.

Health issues

As previously mentioned this breed might be susceptible to many genetic diseases or disorders but there have not been any studies to show this.

Exercise and games

The Braque Saint Germain does not need a high amount of exercise as their energy level is medium. They still need daily exercise. They do best with a fenced off leash area to run. They love frisbee and chasing balls.

Characteristics

The sweet little Corgi is well known with his association with Britain’s Queen Elizabeth who has always loved these dogs with their long bodies and short legs. But while the Corgi may well be associated with royalty, he isn’t too snooty by any means to be your pet.

He has got a wonderful personality, and he is just waiting to be allowed into your household where he will prove to be a loving, devoted companion and friend.

The Braque Saint-Germain is a working dog and a show dog. They are energetic, competitive and driven. They are generally affectionate, loyal and love to cuddle with their people. They need human companionship companionship and can have severe separation anxiety when left by themselves. They love being a member of the family with children, but they are likely to knock very young children down unintentionally.

The Braque Saint-Germain is a loyal, gentle breed and some might even be shy. They are not guard dogs. They are much too friendly toward strangers. Even though they were bred to point and track small game, they can be socialized to be safe living with smaller pets such as cats. They are intelligent, fast learners who love to learn. They also love to work and work long hours without fatigue. They will love to be a jogging or cycling partner.

They do best with large yards, rural areas or in hunting packs. They are not small apartment, city dwellers. They do get along with strangers and other animals. They will warn of strangers, but they are not aggressive.

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