Dorkie vs Corgi - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Dorkie is originated from United States but Corgi is originated from United Kingdom. Dorkie may grow 7 cm / 2 inches shorter than Corgi. Dorkie may weigh 8 kg / 17 pounds lesser than Corgi. Both Dorkie and Corgi has almost same life span. Dorkie may have less litter size than Corgi. Both Dorkie and Corgi requires Low maintenance.

Basic Information

Group:
Toy dog
Herding dogs
Origin:
United States
United Kingdom
Height Male:
13 - 23 cm
5 - 10 inches
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
Height Female:
13 - 23 cm
5 - 10 inches
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
Weight Male:
2 - 6 kg
4 - 14 pounds
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
Weight Female:
2 - 6 kg
4 - 14 pounds
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
Life Span:
10 - 13 Years
12 - 14 Years
Litter Size:
2 - 5
6 - 8
Size:
Small dog
Small dog
Other Names:
Dorkie Terrier
Pembroke, Pem
Colors Available:
Black and tan
Red, black and tan - white markings, fawn
Coat:
Short to long hair
Short to medium length, dense
Shedding:
Minimal
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Docile, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Sweet
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
Yes
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

Dorkie Terriers originate from the United States of America. The small Dorkie, a cross between the Dachshund and the Yorkshire Terrier has a short history, unlike the two dog breeds that were bred to bring him about.

These dog breeds were both used for hunting small animals but the Dorkie today is essentially a companion dog. The International Designer Canine Association started recording registration of the Dorkie from 2009.

Known as a cattle herding dog breed, the Corgi hails from Pembrokeshire, Wales. You get 2 breeds – the Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Welsh Corgi.

The word ‘Korgi’ actually means ‘dwarf dog’. According to some, the small dog’s history goes back as far as 1107AD, but when you start doing research, you find that the Pembroke Welsh Corgi doesn’t have a traceable breed history.

The Pembrokeshire Corgi was officially recognized by the Kennel Club in the United Kingdom in 1934 and is a breed separate from the Cardiganshire Corgi.

Description

The Dorkie is a small hybrid breed standing at 13 – 23cm in height and weighing 2 – 6kg. The Dorkie mostly comes with long, straight hair but there are however Dorkies who have the short hair of the Dachshund.

The Dorkie is hypoallergenic, making them the ideal pet for allergy sufferers. They have floppy ears, a long body and short legs. The tail is long and furry. Most times they come in the Yorkshire Terrier colors of black and tan, but this can also vary.

Temperament:

The Dorkie is a loving, loyal, happy little dog who makes an excellent family dog. Although he isn’t looked upon as your typical lap dog, it is what he is really, as he loves nothing more than to be curling up on your lap or as close to you as he can get.

He loves spending time with his human family and is a social, extrovert kind of dog. Because he is also alert, he will do a good job of alerting his family to danger. He is good with children, but because of his smallness, rough children will need to be careful in rough and tumble games as he could get injured.

Even with a small dog like this, he will need training and socialization otherwise he can become a yapper, which comes from the Dachshund side. Training makes him obedient and relaxed around visitors in the home, and because he is an intelligent breed, he is easy to train and is a great dog for first time dog owners.

The Corgi is a small to medium sized dog, standing at 25 to 30cm and weighs between 10 to 14kg.

The coat of the Corgi is fairly short to medium length and is thick. You’ll find him to be available in colors such as red, fawn, black and tan and with white markings.

He has a sharp, intelligent face with an amicable expression. Looking much like a fox with short legs, he has a long, low-set body body and is a sturdy dog. His ears also stand erect and he has a docked tail.

Health Problems

The Dorkie, being a cross-breed, is a healthy dog and with good care can live t be 10 – 13 years of age. Nonetheless he is still prone to genetic problems and he can inherit traits from both parents.

Diet and Obesity:

A healthy diet will be needed to maintain the Dorkie’s health. You don’t want to overfeed your Dorkie, more so because he is a small dog.

The way you feed a dog can have a massive impact on his health and longevity. Just remember that a dog that is obese will battle to exercise, but also obesity can result in serious health problems, putting strain on the bones and joints too.

You don’t want to feed your dog day after day with kibble, and adding in some cooked rice, vegetables and chicken can just give him a more varied diet. Raw meat can also be included from time to time. Always ensure that there is fresh, cool water available to him.

Skin Allergies:

The most common symptoms of an allergy is skin irritation – your pet will be constantly scratching and licking. Some skin conditions with your Dorkie can be cleared up quickly while some might be so severe as to require lifelong treatment.

A corgi, when he is well looked after, can live to be anything from 12 to 15 years of age. However even this sturdy dog may well be susceptible to some of the more common dog illnesses, such as hip dysplasia and degenerative myelopathy.

Also you have to be careful with your Corgi and make sure that he doesn’t gain weight as this weight gain can bring with it a host of health complications.

Hip Dysplasia:

Hip dysplasia with your Corgi is about an abnormal joint structure where the bones lose contact with each other. This parting of the bones is known as subluxation, and it is this subluxation that can cause your pet pain and discomfort and lead to osteoarthritis.

This disease isn’t reserved for old dogs either, and some young dogs can begin to show signs of this disease before they reach their first birthday. Without taking your dog to the vet and having medical intervention, your pet may eventually be unable to walk.

Degenerative Myelopathy:

It is so sad when Degenerative Myelopathy invades your pet as it is a devastating disease watching your pet become paralyzed. The disease seems to come on when then dog is between 8 and 14 years of age where your pet loses co-ordination in the hind limbs, getting worse until he can no longer walk. Often your dog can no longer control his urine output.

There are no real treatments that have stopped the progression of the disease and your vet may suggest treatments that can make your pet more comfortable You vet may compassionately suggest your dog be put down, particularly for those people who can’t afford treatment.

Caring The Pet

Diet:

What you feed your pet can play an important role in managing health and skin conditions. Speak to your vet about special quality dog foods that can help reduce skin conditions and other nasty reactions to common, unhealthy food ingredients.

Grooming:

Dorkies are very low maintenance dogs, and they will require a brushing every 2 weeks. Those with longer coats may require some professional grooming. Check their teeth regularly and brush them 2 or 3 times a week. The occasional nail clipping may also be required.

Grooming:

The Corgi isn’t a particularly heavy shedder, so a brush down twice a week will be excellent for his thick coat. And of coarse he will thrive on the attention given to him during the brushing session.

Exercise:

Corgis love walks and sniffing around as they go along. They’re energetic dogs so you’ll need to include him in your daily walks which he just loves, and include him in some ball games.

Diet:

Corgis may be short in stature but they are robust dogs – sturdily built. They are active dogs and can use up a lot of calories. They will certainly require a diet that features good quality protein.

Feed your Corgi a good quality food designed for special life stages – puppy, adult, pregnant female, senior dog and also dogs with illnesses.

Most Corgis do well having 2 meals of kibble a day. Puppies usually eat 4 meals a day until they are old enough to move onto an adult feeding schedule. Include cooked rice, meat and vegetables in his diet as well as raw meat from time to time and ensure there is always a bowl of clean, cool water available.

Characteristics

Dorkies are easy going little dogs and adapt easily to life in the city or in the country.

Ideally they are inside dogs, feeling happy and content around their human family. They love adults and children and will get on well with other pets in the home too.

They are quite active little dogs and will thrive on games inside the home or outside in the garden. He may be small, but you can put him on a leash and take him for walks.

They make excellent pets and are only too happy to become a devoted and loyal family member of yours.

The sweet little Corgi is well known with his association with Britain’s Queen Elizabeth who has always loved these dogs with their long bodies and short legs. But while the Corgi may well be associated with royalty, he isn’t too snooty by any means to be your pet.

He has got a wonderful personality, and he is just waiting to be allowed into your household where he will prove to be a loving, devoted companion and friend.

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