Galgo Espanol vs Corgi - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Galgo Espanol is originated from Spain but Corgi is originated from United Kingdom. Galgo Espanol may grow 37 cm / 15 inches higher than Corgi. Galgo Espanol may weigh 15 kg / 34 pounds more than Corgi. Both Galgo Espanol and Corgi has almost same life span. Both Galgo Espanol and Corgi has same litter size. Both Galgo Espanol and Corgi requires Low maintenance.

Basic Information

Group:
Hound dog
Herding dogs
Origin:
Spain
United Kingdom
Height Male:
66 - 67 cm
25 - 27 inches
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
Height Female:
65 - 66 cm
25 - 26 inches
25 - 30 cm
9 - 12 inches
Weight Male:
27 - 29 kg
59 - 64 pounds
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
Weight Female:
23 - 25 kg
50 - 56 pounds
10 - 14 kg
22 - 31 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 15 Years
12 - 14 Years
Litter Size:
6 - 8
6 - 8
Size:
Large dog
Small dog
Other Names:
Spanish Galgo, Galgo, Spanish Greyhound
Pembroke, Pem
Colors Available:
(brindle),
Red, black and tan - white markings, fawn
Coat:
Smooth or Rough
Short to medium length, dense
Shedding:
Moderate
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Gentle, Intelligent, Quiet, Sweet
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

Galgo Espanol means Spanish with galgo meaning greyhound, thus a Spanish Greyhound. This breed is ancient with their roots in perhaps the English greyhound and others in the sighthound family. They are much like the greyhound in that they are laid back, calm, gentle and quiet, unless they are competing on the local track. Like the greyhound they are shy and reserved; great with kids and other pets. And of course, they love cats.

There are dogs like the Galgo referred to in writing by the ancient Celts and Romans. One author, Arrian, had his own Galgos and used them when hunting. The breed flourished in the second half of the Middle Ages in Spain and well into the 8th century. When the Christians regained control of the Iberian Peninsula, they did away with the hunter old forms of hunting and introduced a new form with hounds that made the Galgo the pride of the aristocracy and not in the homes of the ordinary people. Arrian claim to two types of dogs, the smooth and rough coated.

Muslim and Chrisitan Kings kept Galgo Espanols. In all probability the Saluke and Galgo were crossbred at this time. It was illegal to kill a Galgo and in 1081, the Mayor of Cartuario of Slonza left his Galgo in his will to Diego Citid. Dogs seen in painting from the 12th century look just like dogs of this breed who can be seen today.

It is believed that when the Galgo was developed, it was in the midsection of Spain or the Castillian plains. They ruled the interior of the country while the bloodhound ruled the exterior. The 18th and 19th centuries saw very little change in the breed. However, in the 20th century, there was cross breeding with the English greyhound that produced a leaner, faster and powerful track racing dog. The results was a faster dog without the long distance stamina of the pure Galgo. For this reason, the breeders returned to breeding the pure professional racing dog.

The sport of racing the Galgo earns Spain around sixty million dollars per year. They train anywhere from three to four thousand of the Galgos every year for Open Field Coursing Championships. Still, there no longer is any cross breeding between the Greyhound and the Galgo. The current coursing programs feature a hare that is much hardier and difficult to pursue so the stamina of the old Galgo Espanol is desired. In Castile, where these games are played, the landscape is open with large fields that requires that the hare travels far greater distances. This means that the stamina of the original Galgo Espanol is needed.

When not racing the Galgos have become great house pets. They have a reputation as gentle dogs that are docile and quiet, with good health. This reputation is well earned. They are also successful show dogs in Europe much more than the states. This is perhaps because they are really rare outside of Spain. They are not recognized by the United Kennel Club nor the American Kennel Club.

Known as a cattle herding dog breed, the Corgi hails from Pembrokeshire, Wales. You get 2 breeds – the Cardigan Welsh Corgi and the Welsh Corgi.

The word ‘Korgi’ actually means ‘dwarf dog’. According to some, the small dog’s history goes back as far as 1107AD, but when you start doing research, you find that the Pembroke Welsh Corgi doesn’t have a traceable breed history.

The Pembrokeshire Corgi was officially recognized by the Kennel Club in the United Kingdom in 1934 and is a breed separate from the Cardiganshire Corgi.

Description

Obviously the Galgos looks a lot like the Greyhound, but in some very important ways they are very different. The rear of the Galgos is higher than the front and their muscle are flatter. They are built for endurance while the Greyhound is built for speed. The Galgos is a lighter, smaller dog with larger ear on a long head. They have long tails and their chests are not deep like the Greyhounds.

The Galgo comes in smooth and rough coats and a variety of colors. The rough coat protects dogs that are in climates colder than the ones in Spain and also keeps them from injuring their skin while running. The colors include brindle, black, golden, toasted, cinnamon, yellow, red, white, white with patches, or any color as long as they have a white forehead and muzzle.

The Corgi is a small to medium sized dog, standing at 25 to 30cm and weighs between 10 to 14kg.

The coat of the Corgi is fairly short to medium length and is thick. You’ll find him to be available in colors such as red, fawn, black and tan and with white markings.

He has a sharp, intelligent face with an amicable expression. Looking much like a fox with short legs, he has a long, low-set body body and is a sturdy dog. His ears also stand erect and he has a docked tail.

Health Problems

Being a large dog, the Galgo Espanol would normally face a high probability of hip dysplasia. Fortunately for the breed this is not true. In this respect their lightness of weight, their history as a working dog and their anatomy have protected them from it. They are however susceptible to other issues.

Osteosarcoma

Bone Cancer

Malignant tumors that quickly spread throughout the body. Life threatening.

Anesthetics

As a sighthound, the Galgo Espanol is prone to have issues anytime with anesthetics. They don’t metabolize the anesthetics like other dogs do. They will take longer to revive, and they are susceptible to hypothermia while under an aesthetic.

Muscle/Toe Injuries

While running, they are prone to injuries

A corgi, when he is well looked after, can live to be anything from 12 to 15 years of age. However even this sturdy dog may well be susceptible to some of the more common dog illnesses, such as hip dysplasia and degenerative myelopathy.

Also you have to be careful with your Corgi and make sure that he doesn’t gain weight as this weight gain can bring with it a host of health complications.

Hip Dysplasia:

Hip dysplasia with your Corgi is about an abnormal joint structure where the bones lose contact with each other. This parting of the bones is known as subluxation, and it is this subluxation that can cause your pet pain and discomfort and lead to osteoarthritis.

This disease isn’t reserved for old dogs either, and some young dogs can begin to show signs of this disease before they reach their first birthday. Without taking your dog to the vet and having medical intervention, your pet may eventually be unable to walk.

Degenerative Myelopathy:

It is so sad when Degenerative Myelopathy invades your pet as it is a devastating disease watching your pet become paralyzed. The disease seems to come on when then dog is between 8 and 14 years of age where your pet loses co-ordination in the hind limbs, getting worse until he can no longer walk. Often your dog can no longer control his urine output.

There are no real treatments that have stopped the progression of the disease and your vet may suggest treatments that can make your pet more comfortable You vet may compassionately suggest your dog be put down, particularly for those people who can’t afford treatment.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

Feed your puppy a high quality dry food made for large breed dogs. Feed 3 meals a day 2.5 to 3 cups total for the day.

Feeding the adult

Feed your adult Galgo a high quality dry food made for large breed dogs. Feed 2 meals a day but don’t overfeed Give 4-5 cups total for the day.

Points for Good Health

They have amazing stamina and good speed. Generally good health as a breed.

Games and Exercises

He can be a couch potato indoors and runs forever outdoors. He does need daily exercise and bedrest both. The best would be if you could sprint him every day or have a small yard he can play in. They excel of course at agility and lure coursing. Keep them on a leash because if they run you will never catch them. The American Sighthound Field Association presents lure coursing events that they are eligible for. They have exceled at show competition in Europe but are not well known in the U.S.

Grooming:

The Corgi isn’t a particularly heavy shedder, so a brush down twice a week will be excellent for his thick coat. And of coarse he will thrive on the attention given to him during the brushing session.

Exercise:

Corgis love walks and sniffing around as they go along. They’re energetic dogs so you’ll need to include him in your daily walks which he just loves, and include him in some ball games.

Diet:

Corgis may be short in stature but they are robust dogs – sturdily built. They are active dogs and can use up a lot of calories. They will certainly require a diet that features good quality protein.

Feed your Corgi a good quality food designed for special life stages – puppy, adult, pregnant female, senior dog and also dogs with illnesses.

Most Corgis do well having 2 meals of kibble a day. Puppies usually eat 4 meals a day until they are old enough to move onto an adult feeding schedule. Include cooked rice, meat and vegetables in his diet as well as raw meat from time to time and ensure there is always a bowl of clean, cool water available.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

They are good with children, but you need to be careful no one gets knocked down or hurt.

Special talents

Stamina for running and a good record in lure coursing.

Adaptability

Though they can be couch potatoes like greyhounds they are better off with a fenced yard and not an apartment.

Learning ability

They are smart and can learn anything you want to teach them if you can keep their attention.

The sweet little Corgi is well known with his association with Britain’s Queen Elizabeth who has always loved these dogs with their long bodies and short legs. But while the Corgi may well be associated with royalty, he isn’t too snooty by any means to be your pet.

He has got a wonderful personality, and he is just waiting to be allowed into your household where he will prove to be a loving, devoted companion and friend.

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