Chippiparai vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Chippiparai is originated from India but Afghan Hound is originated from Afghanistan. Chippiparai may grow 11 cm / 4 inches shorter than Afghan Hound. Chippiparai may weigh 14 kg / 30 pounds lesser than Afghan Hound. Both Chippiparai and Afghan Hound has almost same life span. Both Chippiparai and Afghan Hound has almost same litter size. Chippiparai requires Low maintenance. But Afghan Hound requires High maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Hound dog
Hound dog
Origin:
India
Afghanistan
Height Male:
60 - 63 cm
23 - 25 inches
68 - 74 cm
26 - 30 inches
Height Female:
58 - 61 cm
22 - 25 inches
60 - 69 cm
23 - 28 inches
Weight Male:
15 - 20 kg
33 - 45 pounds
26 - 34 kg
57 - 75 pounds
Weight Female:
13 - 17 kg
28 - 38 pounds
26 - 34 kg
57 - 75 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 15 Years
12 - 14 Years
Litter Size:
4 - 6
6 - 7
Size:
Medium dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
none
Tazi, Tazhi Spay, Da Kochyano Spay, Sage Balochi, Ogar Afgan, Barakzai Hound, Eastern Greyhound, and Persian Greyhound
Colors Available:
Brindle & White Fawn & White Red Silver-grey
Black, Red and Cream
Coat:
short, smooth
Long, Thick and Silky
Shedding:
Minimal
Moderate
Temperament:
Energetic, Gentle, Intelligent, Loving, Loyal, Protective, Quiet, Stubborn
Affectionate, Detached, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Playful
Grooming:
Low maintenance
High maintenance
Trainability:
Moderate
Hard
Hypoallergenic:
No
Yes
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
No
Yes

History

The Chippiparai is a working dog found in India and until recently there has been little interest in the purity of any breed, but rather only an emphasis on the abilities of the dog. They are only beginning to research the origin and history of their native dogs such as the Chippiparai. Not much is known about the origin of the breed except that it is found almost exclusively in Tamil Nadu and Keraia in the southern part of the subcontinent of India. Other than this there is much speculation about the breed’s origin but very little-known facts. It is indeed an ancient breed; however, its origin could be thousands of years ago or simply hundreds of years ago.

The speculation on the beginnings of the Chippiparai include:

• Perhaps it is a descendant of the Saluki as it resembles this breed quite a bit. It has been believed for some time that the Saluki is the original sighthound and the source of all sighthound breeds. The Saluki was very popular in the Middle East, especially in Persia and Arabia from which it could easily have spread to India. It would then have been shared from Northern India to Southern India where the Chippiparai is found.

• Perhaps the Chippiparai is a descendent of sighthounds from Central Asia and Afghanistan – the Tazi, Taigan, Hortaya Borsaya or the Afghan Hound. This part of Central Asia had more trade, influence and contact with the Indian subcontinent early in their history than with any other region. The Chippiparai is considered by some to be more like these sighthounds than like the Saluki and the interaction between these regions has a much longer history than the Middle East and India.

• It is also speculated that the Chippiparai might have been developed completely and uniquely from the local street and working dogs. With the civilization of India being one of the oldest in the world, it is considered a possibility that the Chippiparai is the descendent of the Harappan hunting dogs that probably were developed by the Indus Valley or Harappa roiling class.

Wherever the Chippiparai came from, they were the exclusive property of the wealthy and ruling castes. These upper castes were the only ones that could legally hunt with dogs or afford to feed one. The royal classes of Tiruneivell, Thanjavur, and Madurai all fed the popularity of the breed among the upper castes. They were coursing dogs used to chase down the prey once it was sighted. The Chippiparai are incredibly fast runners and would catch almost any prey and either hold it or kill it for their hunter. The Chippiparai, when not hunting, had to be chained so they would not chase any small animal that they saw. This confinement also added to the purity of the breed as random breeding was prevented.

The southern part of the Indian subcontinent is extremely hot with routine temperatures over 100’. The Chippiparai was developed to withstand these extreme temperatures and is more heat tolerant than most any other breed. They also need very little food and are resistant to the many parasites and diseases found in southern India.

Harboring the belief that Indian dogs were not as good as European ones, the occupying countries of Portugal, France, and Britain, had no interest in the Chippiparai, again leaving the breed to develop naturally on their own with little or no interbreeding. They also received no formal recognition because Indian culture only valued the dog for its working abilities. There was no Indian Kennel Club until 1956.

The Chippiparai is now very rarely and only found in the area of its birth. Many believe the breed is in danger of becoming extinct and even though it is now registered with Indian Kennel Clubs it is not often shown in their dog shows. Lovers of the breed are now attempting to get Indians to recognize that the Chippiparai is a great companion animal and attempting to save the breed.

afghan houndThe first known information about Afghan Hound was in the 19th century. That dog looked like a Saluki. The breed that we know today is a mix of an Afghan hound accentor which came to Britain in 1920s and other breeds that were popular in that period. Afghan Hound became popular because they were used to hunt big prays in Afghanistan. One of those breeds was Tasy breed. They were very popular among royalty because of its posture and elegance. Their popularity grew very quickly through the whole Europe.

They were also very popular because they were used to hunt antelopes, gazelles, and snow panthers. In India, English soldiers used them as a mail carrier.

Description

The Chippiparai is a typical sighthound although their size and appearance will vary more than that of registered purebred sighthounds. Typically, they will have a long, domed head with small erect ears and dark eyes. Their muzzle will be as deep and wide as the skull but longer. Their legs are straight and long, their chest is roached back and deep, giving them, an appearance very similar to a greyhound or other sighthound.

They have a long curly tail, and their coat can vary greatly in color. They are medium sized, and their coat is short, shiny and close. He is very slender and sleek, which along with his long legs gives him that incredible speed. They are thin with visible ribs.

afghan hound puppyThe average weight of an adult male is 26-34kg, while females are smaller with an average weight approximately 23 kg.

While average height of the Afghan Hound is 68-74cm. Females are slightly smaller with an average height of 63cm.

The lifespan of an Afghan Hound is 12-14 years, but that always depends on the dog to dog. If you have a healthy dog and you take proper care, they tend to live much longer than average lifespan.

Litter Size again variates from dog to dog, but an average litter size is 6-7 puppies.

Afghan hound has many other names, so you might know this breed as Tazi, Tazhi Spay, Da Kochyano Spay, Sage Balochi, Ogar Afgan, Barakzai Hound, Eastern Greyhound, and Persian Greyhound.

Health Problems

There are no clinical studies regarding the health and health history of the Chippiparai, so little is known about their long-term health. However, most who know the breed, believe it is an incredibly healthy one. They seem to have a lot less genetically transmitted health issues than other purebreds. Because of their isolation for centuries in India, they have developed immunities and resistance to most parasites and diseases other dog suffer from.

Because of this you should look for the types of issues that occur in dogs of this size and build. Have them tested by the Canine Eye Registration Foundation and the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals.

afghan hound dogAfghan hounds are generally very healthy breed. But, as every breed, they have tendencies to some health problems. If you want to prevent those diseases it is important to select a right and healthy puppy.

Elbow and hip dysplasia are basically common health problem to any big breed. Juvenile cataracts, Cancer and Hypothyroidism are some of the health problems that have been found in this breed, but overall, with proper care and regular vet checks, you will have a happy and healthy Afghan.

Caring The Pet

Feeding

Do not overfeed your Chippiparai. Feed twice a day and no more than a total of 2.5 cups of high quality dry food.

Health issues

As mentioned previously the Chippiparai seems to have no genetic diseases or issues and very few acquired ones. However, he is sensitive to anesthesia and some foods. He is intolerant to cold weather and has a hard time with his pads on hard surfaces. Some Chippiparai might experience some of the ailments other breeds like them experience.

Dysplasia

Both Elbow and hip are possible. This can cause arthritis and lameness. This occurs when the bone does not fit well into the joint.

Luxating Patella

This can cause lameness as well. The kneecaps slide over the knee instead of staying in place.

Progressive Retinal Atrophy/PRA

Problems with the retina can lead to blindness.

Exercise and games

This is a hunting dog and he will want to hunt. They are incredibly fast and need the opportunity to run. Brisk walks will not be enough for this dog. He is very energetic. They will chase any small animals. It is not recommended that you have small pets even small dogs or cats with a Chippiparai. Having been bred for centuries to hunt, they are not likely to respond to any commands if they are off lease and chasing prey. Do not allow them to be off leash unless in a fenced area, and that fence needs to be 8 feet tall as they can easily jump a seven-foot fence. Try they at coursing, agility, fly ball and frisbee competitions.

afghan hound puppiesAfghan hound loves eating and 2-2.5 cups of high-quality dry food. It is better if the dog is feeding twice a day. Always depends on the activity of the dog, metabolism, age, size and built. So it is important to observe your dog and to realize what is the best quantity of food.

Feeding the Afghan puppy

Feeding the Afghan puppy should be feed at least 3-5 times per day. It is important to feed your puppy with smaller portions, but more times per day.

Grooming the Afghan puppy

Grooming this breed is not very hard, but it requires grooming and taking care of the long coat. Besides a couple of baths, every year and regular everyday grooming will make your dog hair look amazing! Afghan hound is not dog with a lot of requirements.

Characteristics

The Chippiparai is a loving, gentle family dog if well socialized, well trained and well exercised. They are very intelligent and need human companionship. Once they are living with a human family, they are very protective of that family. They are for the most part peaceful and quiet dogs. They are loyal and loving but they are not overly affectionate. Cuddlers they are not, and they do not like to play rough with children.

Accepting and loving within the family, the Chippiparai are equally hesitant and shy around strangers. They can be suspicious, but they are not aggressive. They are just very aloof with strangers, yet they hardly ever bark.

afghan hound dogsAfghan hounds love spending time with one owner or one family. They are not very sociable with other guests. They won’t bark or attack. They simply just don’t enjoy big crowd company. They do not enjoy spending time with children, but if trained properly they will learn to adjust. They simply don’t like quick and sudden movements, but they are not aggressive towards children. They are very independent and intelligent dogs. It is important to be gentle, patient and kind because they love positive training and awards. They are amazing breed with proper owner. Rough handling and punishments will make Afghan hound withdrawn or even depressed. Afghan hound do not tend to please its owner.

Comparison with other breeds

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  33. Norwegian Elkhound vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
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  36. Basset Fauve de Bretagne vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
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  38. Beagle-Harrier vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  39. English Coonhound vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  40. Anglo-Francais de Petite Venerie vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  41. Alpine Dachsbracke vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  42. Basset Bleu de Gascogne vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  43. Podenco Canario vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  44. Dunker vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
  45. Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen vs Afghan Hound - Breed Comparison
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