German Coolie vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison

German Coolie is originated from Australia but Bearded Collie is originated from United Kingdom. Both German Coolie and Bearded Collie are having almost same height. Both German Coolie and Bearded Collie are having almost same weight. German Coolie may live 3 years more than Bearded Collie. German Coolie may have less litter size than Bearded Collie. German Coolie requires Low maintenance. But Bearded Collie requires High maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Herding dogs
Herding dogs
Origin:
Australia
United Kingdom
Height Male:
40 - 60 cm
15 - 24 inches
50 - 55 cm
19 - 22 inches
Height Female:
38 - 58 cm
14 - 23 inches
50 - 55 cm
19 - 22 inches
Weight Male:
15 - 24 kg
33 - 53 pounds
20 - 27 kg
44 - 60 pounds
Weight Female:
13 - 22 kg
28 - 49 pounds
18 - 25 kg
39 - 56 pounds
Life Span:
16 - 18 Years
12 - 15 Years
Litter Size:
4 - 6
5 - 10
Size:
Medium dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
Australian Koolie - German Koolie - Coulie - German Collie
Beardie, Bouncing Beardie
Colors Available:
Black, Red, merle
Black, brown, fawn. Usually with white or cream marks.
Coat:
smooth and comes in short or medium lengths
Harsh outer coat and soft undercoa
Shedding:
Moderate
Seasonal
Temperament:
Alert, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Playful, Social
Affectionate, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Loving, Outgoing, Playful, Stubborn
Grooming:
Low maintenance
High maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

The German Coolie is misnamed as it is an Australian bred dog and often called the Australian Koolie or Coolie. This Australian breed is more often just called a Coolie. The breed is a typical herding breed and a working dog that needs a job all the time. They have been a favorite of Australians since the late 1800’s when local dogs were bred with British working dogs.

Although all Coolie’s are not the same. Within the breed there is a lot of variation. This is because the Coolie was bred individually for different regions in Australia. In a very different writing the Koolie Club of Australia does not define the Coolie breed on confirmation as all other purebred dogs are defined. Instead the Coolie is defined by ability to work. In light of this most Coolie breeders state that the Coolie is a breed and the variations you see among regions are types within the breed.

As a herding dog, the Coolie brought a lot of skill to the Australian farmers and sheep herders. The Coolie will round up the sheep and bring them back to their enclosure at the shepherd’s command. They are upright, silent, working dogs. Not only do they herd sheep they are important at sheering to “cut out” the sheep or assist in the close quarters of lambing.

In Queensland North and New South Wales, the Coolie is medium boned, tall and agile ready to herd cattle over a long stretch of miles. In the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales and the Hunter Valley Region, the Coolie is shorter and thicker in order to be able to get cattle that are lying low out from the gullies and dense bush. The Coolies found in Victoria are the smallest of all.

No matter where they live and work, the Coolie is bred to help the workers there, the farmers, the stockman, and the grazier. All Coolies are adaptable and very agile. They all have a strong willfulness to accomplish what they are asked to do. The ancestors of these various Coolie was the British Collie – a smooth coated, blue merle. This Collie was crossed with the Black and Tan Collie from the Scottish Highlands. It is believed that these are the same Collie breeds that came to Australia to create the Heeler.

The name may come from the German immigrants working in South Australia and unable to pronounce Collie incorrectly they called the dogs German Coolies. There is also a fraction of German breeders who believe that the German Tiger dog was brought to Australia in the 18th century and then when the Collies came they were bred together. Many Coolie breeders have records showing that the breed has been in Australia for at least 160 years. It is also believed that the Border Collie and Kelpie (Blue Heeler) were mixed into the breed at sometime as well.

No bench standard exists for the German Coolie even though there is the Koolie Club of Australia. The mission of the club is to protect, preserve and promote the breed. The Australian Sporting Register was recognizing the Coolies in 2004. They are eligible to participate in the Australian National Kennel Council sanctioned sporting trials. They participate in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria through the individual states sporting register. Here they participate in herding, jumping, obedience, agility and tracking.

Several other recognitions as a herding breed soon followed. The Australian Shepherd Club of America, the American Herding Breed Association, were followed by recognition from others as well. They are not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

This long-haired herding breed was bred by mixing the two sheepdog breeds: the Scottish dogs and the Polish sheepdogs. The Bearded Collie gained the popularity during the last century by winning some of the Dog Shows. This friendly dog with the beautiful coat is surely one of the most specific pets. Nowadays, the Bearded Collie is very popular. The organizations for breeding, saving, rescuing and adopting this breed can be found in the USA.

Description

With their strong ancestry among the family of collies and herders, the German Coolie shares the look of collies and shepherds. Even though they differ from region to region and there is no actual standard, they are medium sized dogs with blue or brown eyes or even one of each. The ears are folded over on top when relaxed but they are rigid and straight when he is more alert. The nose is either chocolate or red depending on the color of their coat.

They can have either a long, medium or short coat but most owners want the short coat that is smooth as well. The coat can be one color – red/chocolate or black; Bi – red/white or black/white; Tri – solid black or red with white and brown; Tri merle -merle with white and brown; Merle – red merles and blue merles. Regardless of color, the German Coolie has the look of a collie or German Shepherd.

The Beardie is easy to recognize because of the longer hairs on the cheeks, chin and under the lower lip. This medium-sized Bouncing Beardie is usually the great family pet because he is very friendly and loving. This breed is extremely active and they are energetic despite their longer bodies. They grow up to have more than one coat colour, but they are all born one coloured. They always have white or cream markings. This smart dog can be very stubborn and independent, if you keep your dog in a yard, he will use every chance to escape.

Health Problems

This is a relatively healthy breed without many genetic disorders found in purebreds due to the 160 years they have spent fairly isolated and allowing natural selection to take its course.

Blindness/Deafness

In Merle dogs there can be deafness and/or blindness. If you breed a solid to a merle you can eliminate that.

Joint Issues

These are not inherited but rather acquired due to the immense amount of jumping and running.

  1. Allergies
  2. Minor skin allergies are possible in some.
  3. Seizures

Rare but it does occur and can be fatal if not treated

This breed is generally very healthy. They don’t have some major health issues. Some of the issues that are registered are:

Progressive retinal atrophy

The degenerative disease that causes the blindness.

Thyroid glands diseases

When the hormone produced by the thyroid gland is abnormally low.

Hip dysplasia

That is generally the hereditary disease, can also be caused by bad diet or injuries.

Allergies

To food, chemicals, pollen, dust...

Ear infections

That usually happens because of their dropped ears that are not very easy to clean.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

Break meals into 3 a day feeding a high quality dry puppy food designed for dogs of his size. 11/2 to 2 cups per day.

Feeding the adult

Break meals into 2 a day feeding a high quality dry adult food designed for dogs of his size.

Points for Good Health

Traditionally good health. Great energy, intensity and devotion to work and owner.

Games and Exercises

This is an energetic dog that loves to work and needs to work. Regular routine exercise is needed daily. He needs to be stimulated mentally and physically. Find him a job. Make sure he knows what you want him to do. They work well with a human partner in games such as agility, tracking, flyball and herding. They need a large yard and a lot of play time. They are not couch potatoes and would be unhappy if they were stuck in a house or apartment

Diet tips

Raising your Bearded Collie pup on a high-quality food is usually enough for a puppy. Make sure that portions are appropriate for his age and weight. Once your pet is more than six months old, they will need only two meals per day. They get obese very easy. Don’t train them with the treats.

Tips for good health

To care for your Bearded Collie, you must be aware of the grooming responsibilities that come with this longhaired pet. During the shedding period, it is required to brush them daily. Bathing is not a regular necessity but it will be easier to keep him clean and well groomed if you care about your pet all the time. Some people like to shorten the coat for their Beardie, and it is usually done during summer. Make sure to take him to regular ear, eye, teeth and hip vet checks.

Tips for games and exercises

The Bearded Collie is a breed that requires daily activity. They have very playful nature and they love to run, play and spend time outdoors. The best option will be a big yard so that Beardie can run for hours without the leash.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

Yes, they can be very friendly with children is they are socialized and supervised.

Special talents

They have enough stamina to work for 14 hours a day.

Adaptability

They are very adaptable. They can be calm and steady when working a mother and baby lamb and then be able to forcefully move steers, bull, rams or weathers.

Learning ability

The breed is highly intelligent, and their learning ability is excellent because they want to please you.

Children friendliness

The Bouncing Beardie is great with children. They are very playful, jumpy and have generally very sweet and gentle personality. Children love them because they never get tired. If properly socialized, this dog can be the main attraction for any child.

Special talents

Herding, agility shows, obedience competitions, treibball, show dogs, trally...

Adaptability

This breed is very friendly. If your family is about to raise the Bearded Collie, prepare to have a pet that is highly affectionate and bonded with the members of the family. They don’t do well if left alone. They usually don’t bark and they are never destructible, but loneliness somehow triggers odd behaviour with this breed. They are not usually scared of strangers. If they are trained and socialized, you will be able to take your Beardie anywhere you go.

Learning ability

Some say that is very easy to train the Bearded Collie. The rule for this breed is to start the obedience training while they are very small. They are generally very independent, and they will try to do things in their own way. If you start your training early before your Beardie forms this kind of personality, you will have a wonderful pet.

Comparison with other breeds

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  37. English Shepherd vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  38. Catahoula Cur vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  39. Catalan Sheepdog vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  40. Pyrenean Shepherd vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  41. Bergamasco vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  42. Berger Picard vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  43. Appenzell Mountain Dog vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  44. Queensland Heeler vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  45. Bohemian Shepherd vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  46. Croatian Sheepdog vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  47. Red Heeler vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
  48. Belgian Shepherd Dog (Tervuren) vs Bearded Collie - Breed Comparison
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