German Coolie vs Central Asian Shepherd - Breed Comparison

German Coolie is originated from Australia but Central Asian Shepherd is originated from Russia. German Coolie may grow 10 cm / 3 inches shorter than Central Asian Shepherd. German Coolie may weigh 26 kg / 57 pounds lesser than Central Asian Shepherd. German Coolie may live 3 years more than Central Asian Shepherd. German Coolie may have less litter size than Central Asian Shepherd. German Coolie requires Low maintenance. But Central Asian Shepherd requires Moderate maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Herding dogs
Working dog
Origin:
Australia
Russia
Height Male:
40 - 60 cm
15 - 24 inches
62 - 70 cm
24 - 28 inches
Height Female:
38 - 58 cm
14 - 23 inches
62 - 70 cm
24 - 28 inches
Weight Male:
15 - 24 kg
33 - 53 pounds
40 - 50 kg
88 - 111 pounds
Weight Female:
13 - 22 kg
28 - 49 pounds
40 - 50 kg
88 - 111 pounds
Life Span:
16 - 18 Years
12 - 15 Years
Litter Size:
4 - 6
4 - 10
Size:
Medium dog
Large dog
Other Names:
Australian Koolie - German Koolie - Coulie - German Collie
Central Asian Ovtcharka
Colors Available:
Black, Red, merle
brindle, flecked and bi-colored, grey, black, White, tan
Coat:
smooth and comes in short or medium lengths
Short hair and long haired
Shedding:
Moderate
Moderate, Seasonal
Temperament:
Alert, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Playful, Social
Affectionate, Aggressive, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Moderate maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Moderate
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
No

History

The German Coolie is misnamed as it is an Australian bred dog and often called the Australian Koolie or Coolie. This Australian breed is more often just called a Coolie. The breed is a typical herding breed and a working dog that needs a job all the time. They have been a favorite of Australians since the late 1800’s when local dogs were bred with British working dogs.

Although all Coolie’s are not the same. Within the breed there is a lot of variation. This is because the Coolie was bred individually for different regions in Australia. In a very different writing the Koolie Club of Australia does not define the Coolie breed on confirmation as all other purebred dogs are defined. Instead the Coolie is defined by ability to work. In light of this most Coolie breeders state that the Coolie is a breed and the variations you see among regions are types within the breed.

As a herding dog, the Coolie brought a lot of skill to the Australian farmers and sheep herders. The Coolie will round up the sheep and bring them back to their enclosure at the shepherd’s command. They are upright, silent, working dogs. Not only do they herd sheep they are important at sheering to “cut out” the sheep or assist in the close quarters of lambing.

In Queensland North and New South Wales, the Coolie is medium boned, tall and agile ready to herd cattle over a long stretch of miles. In the Snowy Mountains of New South Wales and the Hunter Valley Region, the Coolie is shorter and thicker in order to be able to get cattle that are lying low out from the gullies and dense bush. The Coolies found in Victoria are the smallest of all.

No matter where they live and work, the Coolie is bred to help the workers there, the farmers, the stockman, and the grazier. All Coolies are adaptable and very agile. They all have a strong willfulness to accomplish what they are asked to do. The ancestors of these various Coolie was the British Collie – a smooth coated, blue merle. This Collie was crossed with the Black and Tan Collie from the Scottish Highlands. It is believed that these are the same Collie breeds that came to Australia to create the Heeler.

The name may come from the German immigrants working in South Australia and unable to pronounce Collie incorrectly they called the dogs German Coolies. There is also a fraction of German breeders who believe that the German Tiger dog was brought to Australia in the 18th century and then when the Collies came they were bred together. Many Coolie breeders have records showing that the breed has been in Australia for at least 160 years. It is also believed that the Border Collie and Kelpie (Blue Heeler) were mixed into the breed at sometime as well.

No bench standard exists for the German Coolie even though there is the Koolie Club of Australia. The mission of the club is to protect, preserve and promote the breed. The Australian Sporting Register was recognizing the Coolies in 2004. They are eligible to participate in the Australian National Kennel Council sanctioned sporting trials. They participate in Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria through the individual states sporting register. Here they participate in herding, jumping, obedience, agility and tracking.

Several other recognitions as a herding breed soon followed. The Australian Shepherd Club of America, the American Herding Breed Association, were followed by recognition from others as well. They are not recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC).

This large dog breed is a native to the wilds of Central Asia, where it has been guarding and protecting livestock for thousands of years. In fact the Central Asian Shepherd is one of the oldest dog breeds of the world.

Early records as to the precise origin of the breed aren’t available. There are suggestions that the breed descended from ancient Middle Eastern livestock guarding breeds, while the other suggests the dog is descended from the Tibetan Mastiff. It is almost certain that the dog was domesticated from the Wolf.

Description

With their strong ancestry among the family of collies and herders, the German Coolie shares the look of collies and shepherds. Even though they differ from region to region and there is no actual standard, they are medium sized dogs with blue or brown eyes or even one of each. The ears are folded over on top when relaxed but they are rigid and straight when he is more alert. The nose is either chocolate or red depending on the color of their coat.

They can have either a long, medium or short coat but most owners want the short coat that is smooth as well. The coat can be one color – red/chocolate or black; Bi – red/white or black/white; Tri – solid black or red with white and brown; Tri merle -merle with white and brown; Merle – red merles and blue merles. Regardless of color, the German Coolie has the look of a collie or German Shepherd.

The Central Asian Shepherd is a large dog, standing at up to 70cm in height and weighing in the region of 50kg. The dog is powerfully built and muscular, with the tail being traditionally docked to a short bob. Undocked, the tail is naturally long, thick at the base and tapering down. When relaxed, the tail is carried low, but when he becomes alert and excited, the tail is up and curved.

The ears of this dog are also traditionally cropped close to the head so that the dog almost appears to have no visible ears. This practice is also falling away and the natural ears of this breed are small and set at- or below eye level.

The brown eyes are small to medium size and are deep set. The Central Asian Shepherd Dog is double-coated with short to medium length hair and can be found in quite a few different colors such as tan, white, black, grey, brindle, ticked or a blend of these colors.

Temperament:

You have to be careful about where you buy your Asian Shepherd from as these dogs can be prone to aggression. With good breeding however, the dog is evenly tempered. As a first time dog owner, this shouldn’t be your first choice as it is a dominant, wilful, territorial, independent dog who will require a tough, firm, strong owner. Training and socialization are imperative to ensure he becomes obedient. He is then capable of forming close and strong bonds with his master, becoming a loyal and devoted pet. He also makes an excellent guard dog.

He is a protective dog breed, and once trained can get on well with children and other pets. He is the kind of dog that you will want to supervise around small children.

Health Problems

This is a relatively healthy breed without many genetic disorders found in purebreds due to the 160 years they have spent fairly isolated and allowing natural selection to take its course.

Blindness/Deafness

In Merle dogs there can be deafness and/or blindness. If you breed a solid to a merle you can eliminate that.

Joint Issues

These are not inherited but rather acquired due to the immense amount of jumping and running.

  1. Allergies
  2. Minor skin allergies are possible in some.
  3. Seizures

Rare but it does occur and can be fatal if not treated

The Central Asian Shepherd doesn't have any hereditary ailments and he is generally a healthy, robust breed.

Large breeds are always prone to hip- and elbow dysplasia, an abnormal development of hip and elbow, brought about by a number of factors such as genetics, the wrong diet and rapid growth with some large puppies.

A dysplastic hip or elbow doesn’t move smoothly as it should, and this results in joint inflammation and pain. Symptoms can include loss of muscle mass, pain when moving around and difficulty with standing up again once your pet lies down.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

Break meals into 3 a day feeding a high quality dry puppy food designed for dogs of his size. 11/2 to 2 cups per day.

Feeding the adult

Break meals into 2 a day feeding a high quality dry adult food designed for dogs of his size.

Points for Good Health

Traditionally good health. Great energy, intensity and devotion to work and owner.

Games and Exercises

This is an energetic dog that loves to work and needs to work. Regular routine exercise is needed daily. He needs to be stimulated mentally and physically. Find him a job. Make sure he knows what you want him to do. They work well with a human partner in games such as agility, tracking, flyball and herding. They need a large yard and a lot of play time. They are not couch potatoes and would be unhappy if they were stuck in a house or apartment

Central Asians are large dogs and when he is looked after well he can reach up to 15 years of age.

Diet:

It is important to see that he receives top quality, size-specific food, of which he eats a lot, and that it has all the vitamins and minerals he needs for his size.

A puppy will need high energy foods because of their energy. As he grows bigger, protein will become imperative. It is always a treat for your pet to add in some brown rice, vegetables and cooked chicken into his kibble from time to time.

Raw meat can be expensive, but if you can, it is important to ensure that your large pet gets some raw meat into his diet too, to keep his skin and coat healthy and to ward off disease. Make sure he has non-stop access to a bowl of fresh, cool water.

Grooming:

As previously mentioned, the coat of the Central Asian Shepherd can be fairly short but it can also be medium length. He isn't going to require any exceptional grooming but you will certainly need to give him a good brush twice a week, more so in his shedding periods. This will rid him of loose hair and keep his coat free of tangles and matting.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

Yes, they can be very friendly with children is they are socialized and supervised.

Special talents

They have enough stamina to work for 14 hours a day.

Adaptability

They are very adaptable. They can be calm and steady when working a mother and baby lamb and then be able to forcefully move steers, bull, rams or weathers.

Learning ability

The breed is highly intelligent, and their learning ability is excellent because they want to please you.

It is important for those interested in the Central Asian Shepherd Dog as a pet to do some research on the breed. For instance this is a large dog that has been used for fighting.

While he can’t be described as being overly aggressive, you do need to be aware of his history, especially when you have small children in the home.

This dog is intelligent and confident too while also being exceptionally protective, and therefore he makes a good watchdog.

It is essential to have your Central Asian trained and socialized, and then he becomes far more relaxed and obedient, making him a loyal, loving guardian and friend.

Comparison with other breeds

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