German Longhaired Pointer vs Carpatin - Breed Comparison

German Longhaired Pointer is originated from Germany but Carpatin is originated from Romania. Both German Longhaired Pointer and Carpatin are having almost same height. German Longhaired Pointer may weigh 48 kg / 105 pounds lesser than Carpatin. Both German Longhaired Pointer and Carpatin has same life span. German Longhaired Pointer may have less litter size than Carpatin. German Longhaired Pointer requires Moderate maintenance. But Carpatin requires Low maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Working dog
Working dog
Origin:
Germany
Romania
Height Male:
58 - 70 cm
22 - 28 inches
65 - 73 cm
25 - 29 inches
Height Female:
58 - 70 cm
22 - 28 inches
63 - 69 cm
24 - 28 inches
Weight Male:
27 - 32 kg
59 - 71 pounds
32 - 80 kg
70 - 177 pounds
Weight Female:
27 - 32 kg
59 - 71 pounds
30 - 80 kg
66 - 177 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 14 Years
12 - 14 Years
Litter Size:
4 - 6
5 - 10
Size:
Large dog
Large dog
Other Names:
Deutsch-Langhaar, GLP
Romanian Shepherd, Romanian Carpathian Shepherd, Carpathian Sheepdog
Colors Available:
Chocolate brown
Grey, fawn with a grey overlay, grey-black
Coat:
Medium length and wavy
Medium length and dense
Shedding:
Moderate
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Territorial
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Territorial
Grooming:
Moderate maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Moderate
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

Looking at the German Longhaired Pointer you may think that you’re looking at a type of Setter dog or even a large Spaniel. These pointing dogs, hailing from Germany, are gun dogs or working dogs, having always been used to track game.

They were developed at the end of the 19th century, as breeders were specifically looking for a dog that was faster than the wiry- and short hair German pointers. Crossing English Setters and Pointers gave breeders this German Longhaired Pointer and the dog was shown for the first time in Germany in 1879.

Known as the GLP or Deutsch-Langhaar, the dog has the bloodlines of water dogs and scenthounds, and way back In 1897, Baron von Schorlemer wrote the first standard for the German Longhaired.

The Carpatin, known also as the Carpathian Shepherd Dog or Romanian Shepherd, is a large breed dog known for his guarding- and watch-dog abilities. Information about these dogs dates back to the 1800s, and much later, in March 1998, fans of the dog founded the Carpathian Shepherd Dogs Club.

It is believed that the different Carpathian Shepherd Dog breeds are descendants from dogs that were developed thousands of years ago in Mesopotamia. Documentation of the origins of the dog are rare but it is thought that they are probable descendants of Lupomolossoids. However in 2005, it was finally recognized by the Federation Cynologique Internationale, and in 2006, it was recognized by the United Kennel Club. However, it is still a rare breed outside Romania.

Description

Athletic and lean, the German Longhaired Pointer is a medium to large sized dog standing at 60 – 70 cm in height and weighing 25 to 32kg.

With his webbed feet, he can move with great speed. It is why the dog isn’t suited well to life in the city really, as he has always been a dog used to working and running over large areas. He will appreciate being with an active owner.

The beautiful double coat is medium length, slightly wavy and with feathering around the legs, chest and tail. The tail itself is carried stretched outwards or kept low. It is rich brown to coppery color, while some white can sometimes be found on the chest and paws. The attractive dog has brown eyes, a black nose and ears which are long and floppy.

Temperament:

Intelligent, gentle and amicable the German Longhaired Pointer is an affectionate, loyal dog who is also social, getting on well with other pets in the home as well as with children.

Being the loyal dog that he is, it makes him susceptible to separation anxiety so he should never be put into the backyard and left day after day on his own.

Looks:

The Carpatin is a large breed dog, standing at 65 to 73cm in height and weighing between 32- and 80kg. The skull of the dog is wide and domed, the ears medium set and floppy. The neck is strong and muscled, the legs strong and straight, the chest deep.

The tail of the Carpatin is long, bushy and high set and his coat is double layered, medium length and pale fawn in color with light grey to black shades being seen as well.

Temperament:

The Carpatin is patient, loving and protective. This is a strong-willed dog who is independent and fairly easy to train as he is intelligent.

It is a good idea to have him trained and socialized as this brings out the best in him. He is a patient and affectionate dog and he’ll get on well with children and tolerate other pets in the home.

They are wary of strangers and become vocal, barking and growling and taking their guard dog role seriously with strangers around.

Health Problems

You’ll find that with an excellent diet and lots of love and care your German Longhaired Pointer can easily push 12 to 14 years of age.

If you’re a novice dog owner, talking with your vet will give you a good idea of how to feed your dog to ensure longevity.

No matter how vibrant and energetic your pet is, there may well come a day when he is lethargic, he just wants to lie, he doesn't want to eat and he doesn’t jump up to greet you. Then it’s time for concern and to get your 4-legged friend to the vet.

There are several health problems associated with dogs that are worth researching – hip dysplasia, skin allergies, progressive retinal atrophy, allergies and cataracts.

The beautiful Carpatin dog can live to be a healthy 12-14 years if you feed him nutritious foods, provide him with clean water every day, exercise him, give him a dry, warm bed and give him loads of love, attention and care.

However every dog can become ill and with the Carpathian Shepherd Dog you certainly want to be aware of ear and eye infections, hip dysplasia and skin disorders.

Caring The Pet

Diet:

German Longhaired Pointers have the same kind of nutritional needs as all other active working or sporting dog breeds. He needs high quality food, and if you feed him a commercially manufactured food, make sure its the best and that it has minerals and vitamins for active, large breeds. Most of the dog food companies have breed-specific formulas for size, age and activity levels of dogs.

Always ensure an ongoing supply of cool, fresh water is available to him.

Grooming:

The coat of the German Longhair can become matted and he will require brushing at least twice a week to keep the hair free of loose hairs as well as burrs that could lead to the coat becoming untidy and tangled. The ears will also have to be watched as thick matting can occur. Also check the inside of his ears to avoid dirt and wax build up which can lead to ear infections.

General grooming will also be reqired such as checking the length of the nails if they aren’t naturally worn down. Don’t neglect his teeth and brush 2 or 3x a week with canine toothpaste and toothbrush.

Exercise:

Your German Longhaired isn’t a dog who likes to spend his days lying round. He is energetic and loves to be on the go. From robust ball games to rope games, running with you as you go running, swimming or cycling, this dog can’t seem to get enough exercise and will want to be included in all your activities.

Grooming:

Despite his longish coat, the Carpatin is a low to moderate maintenance dog. To avoid tangles and matting, you’ll need to brush his hair at least twice a week. He won’t however require professional grooming.

Dogs with floppy ears will need to have the ears checked to ensure they remain fee of moisture and wax buid-up. The ears can be easily infected when left uncleaned. The nails and teeth should also be checked. Canine toothpaste and brush can help to prevent plaque build-up which can cause gum disease and tooth decay. Not only that, dental disease can lead to other health issues in other parts of the body.

Exercise:

The Carpatin is a medium- to high energy level breed dog and he will therefore need a good amount of exercise to keep him healthy and content. Rope him in to your activities whether you go jogging or cycling. Put him on a leash and take him with – he’ll love it. Dogs who are allowed to be active and part of the family are simply better dogs.

Diet:

Your Carpatin’s weight, age and activity levels will guide you as to what food is best for him. He needs nutritious food and if you’re unsure how to choose, your veterinarian can advise you on what to look for.

Apart from proteins, your dog needs fats, fiber, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins. As your dog ages, he or she will go through different life stages, and you want to be sure of ensuring your dog is getting everything he needs to ward of disease and stay happy and healthy.

Make sure your 4-legged canine friend always has a bowl of fresh, cool water available to him.

Characteristics

German Longhaired Pointers are calm, friendly dogs who want to please their owners. They’re really intelligent too so training and socialization won’t be difficult with this bright dog.

Once trained, he makes an excellent, loyal and loving family pet. With a firm, kind, consistent type of owner, the German Longhaired Pointer is guaranteed to make you a wonderful pet.

The Carpatin is a big, independent dog who loves his human family. He will guard them too and has all the intelligence and skills to be instinctively alert to danger. Territorial, he makes an excellent watchdog.

He isn’t too social around strangers, but with training and socialization he becomes more relaxed and amicable. He responds well to training, especially when he has a firm, strong handler and owner.

Used to being a herding- and working dog, he is happiest when kept busy and isn’t a dog to use essentially for guarding only as he can become aloof and aggressive. Treat him well and have him trained and socialized and you’ll have a wonderful guardian and companion.

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