Mixed vs Korean Mastiff - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Mixed is originated from United States but Korean Mastiff is originated from South Korea. Mixed may grow 34 cm / 14 inches higher than Korean Mastiff. Mixed may weigh 38 kg / 84 pounds more than Korean Mastiff. Mixed may live 8 years more than Korean Mastiff. Mixed may have more litter size than Korean Mastiff. Both Mixed and Korean Mastiff requires Moderate maintenance.

Basic Information

Group:
Companion dog
Molosser dogs
Origin:
United States
South Korea
Height Male:
9 - 110 cm
3 - 44 inches
59 - 76 cm
23 - 30 inches
Height Female:
9 - 110 cm
3 - 44 inches
59 - 76 cm
23 - 30 inches
Weight Male:
2 - 112 kg
4 - 247 pounds
65 - 74 kg
143 - 164 pounds
Weight Female:
2 - 112 kg
4 - 247 pounds
65 - 74 kg
143 - 164 pounds
Life Span:
9 - 20 Years
10 - 12 Years
Litter Size:
1 - 12
4 - 6
Size:
Large dog
Large dog
Other Names:
Cross breed, mutt, cur, mongrel
Mee Kyun Dosa
Colors Available:
cream, tri-colored, Brown, tan, black, white, bi-colored, liver, chocolate
brown, Reddish, rusty, orange
Coat:
Short to long, single or double-coat
Short and smooth
Shedding:
Moderate
Moderate
Temperament:
Affectionate, Aggressive, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Detached, Docile, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Sweet, Territorial
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
Moderate maintenance
Moderate maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

Many people are inclined to think that mixed breed or cross-breed dogs, also known as mutts or mongrels or designer dogs are just pavement specials. They think they look nothing much better than junkyard mutts.

This may be so, but not always, and these mixed breed dogs always seem to have hearts of gold. A Mixed breed is a dog that has parent’s who aren’t registered and who come from different breeds. In other words the parents aren’t of the same breed.

Guessing a cross breed’s ancestry can be difficult as these mixed-breeds have more genetic variation than pure breeds. They've been around since ancient times. The dogs originate in different countries and they all have different coats, different sizes and different temperaments.

It is sad but true – there are literally millions of mixed dogs worldwide, some of which never know what it is to live with- and be lovingly cared for by a human being.

korean mastiffThis large breed dog is also known as the Mee Kyun Dosa. In spite of his huge size, he isn’t aggressive at all and is bred to be a companion dog.

He was originally developed to be a working dog. The dog was developed in the late 1800’s from European and Asian working breeds. Those interested in dog breeds suspected that a crossing of the Japanese Tosa-Inu with the Neapolitan Mastiff and the Dogue de Bordeaux brought about the breed. They also thought that the Saint Bernard and English Mastiff were brought in later on as well.

These large molosser dogs have been developed through years of inbreeding. It is one of the biggest dogs in Korea.

Description

Sometimes Mixed dog breeds come about from two dogs meeting on the streets and mating or it could be two pure-breeds accidentally mating, resulting in a mixed breed.

The mixed breed dog puppy could inherit looks from just the one purebred parent so that he grows up looking like a pure-breed. With a cross breed the standard for breeding isn’t the same for purebreds where the appearance and temperament is more or less the same.

A mixed breed dog doesn’t have these standards to conform to and they are as varied and unique as the colors in the rainbow. It’s not possible to know what a mixed breed dog’s puppies will look like. A typical example of a mixed breed is a Labradoodle. People love the temperament of the Labrador but they want the low shedding qualities of the Poodle as well.

Mixed breed dogs can be small or large and that means different litter sizes. If you don’t want your Mixed dog breed becoming a parent, you can spay or neuter your dog.

Temperament:

There are many people who avoid choosing a ridiculously high priced pure breed puppy and they prefer to choose a mixed breed. This is partly because these mixed breed dogs are healthy, resilient and nearly always a good match for you and your family.

korean mastiff puppyYou can’t help but stare at the Korean Mastiff because of his strong, muscular neck of loose skin that forms dewlaps. His face is wrinkled and he has a cumbersome, sluggish gait.

He is a large dog standing at anything between 59 to 76cm in height, both male and female. He can weigh between 65 to 74kg. He is noticeable because of his fairly loose fitting coat, which is short and smooth and which is a rich, shiny reddish, orange or brown colour.

The nose of the dog is broad and dark, the ears soft and floppy and he has eyes which are set wide apart.

Temperament:

The Korean Mastiff is reserved with strangers but he is friendly and even tempered with his human family, making an ideal pet.

He is looked upon as a gentle giant, being an oversized playmate for children and he also tolerates other pets in the home.

He isn't an overly energetic dog, but that doesn't mean he shouldn't be exercised. He will need long walks to avoid him putting on weight.

Health Problems

All dogs, whether pure breeds or mixed breeds, need to be excellently cared for. When you consider the unconditional love your dog gives you, you want to ensure that you’re kind and loving towards him.

Every dog can be prone to common dog illnesses and there are some genetic predispositions for dogs with certain breeds within them.

Dental Disease:

All dogs can battle with problem teeth, but it appears to be more rife with smaller dogs. Dental disease starts with tartar build-up and when it isn’t removed from the teeth it progresses towards infection of the gums and teeth.

What you need to know is that not caring for the teeth can mean your pet losing his teeth but also putting your dog in danger of joint disease and problems with the kidneys and heart.

Obesity:

Obesity is a huge factor in small- and large dogs and can pave the way for other diseases with your pet. Being obese can shorten the life of your pet because it contributes to heart disease, digestive disorders, back pain and joint problems.

Parasites:

Fleas, ticks, mites and worms can play havoc with the health of your pet. Some of these parasites can then be transmitted from your pet to you. Parasites can cause pain, weight loss and even death for your pet so it is important to be vigilant in these matters.

Bloat, when the stomach twists and fills with gas as well as cancer and heart disease are just some of the more common diseases to look out for.

korean mastiff dogTreat your big Mastiff dog like the wonderful fur-child he is and make sure your attend to all his medical needs to avoid pain and discomfort for him.

Cherry Eye:

Cherry eye is a fairly common health issue with this breed. It affects the tear gland of the third eyelid, and if left untreated, can lead to ongoing eye problems.

All dogs have a third eyelid, as well as two tear producing glands to lubricate the eyes. Its an important protective component to eye health in dogs. When the connective tissue that holds the gland in place is damaged or weak, there is a red protrusion of the gland from the lower eye. This is a congenital disorder. Don’t ignore it, but get your pet to the vet so you can catch it early.

Bloat:

Canine bloat, known as gastric dilatation and volvulus can be a killer disease for your pet, more so with deep-chested, large breeds.

Gas accumulation is known as bloat, and its the accumulation of gas which can cause the stomach to rotate. A dog can go into shock from bloat. The reason for this is that the stomach expands, putting pressure on veins. Blood can’t flow as it should and the blood supply gets cut off to the stomach.

Your dog could be vomiting, restless, the stomach hard and bloated or he may be drooling. Dogs who gobble their food down and eat just one large meal a day have an increased susceptibility to GDV than other dogs.

The wrong ingredients of a dog’s diet can also contribute to bloat. High quality food and feeding your pet smaller meals can help.

Caring The Pet

Good nutritious food, exercise, grooming, a dry place to sleep, taking your pet to the vet when he is sick as well as plenty of love and attention will ensure your Mixed dog breed’s health and happiness.

  • Brush his coat twice a week.
  • Check the ears and eyes for infection.
  • Check his teeth and be careful what you give your pet to chew on.

Keep die diet of your pet simple and consistent to avoid digestive problems. Quality commercially manufactured food is a good choice. Boiled chicken, brown rice and cooked or raw vegetables will be excellent added into your dog’s kibble from time to time. Add in some raw meat occasionally as it is good for warding off skin diseases.

Exercise your pet regularly, but don’t overdo it with young dogs as it can lead to joint problems later on in life.

Grooming:

korean mastiff puppiesA Korean Mastiff is an easy dog to groom with his short smooth coat. He is a moderate shedder so a brush twice a week will be sufficient to maintain the shiny, smooth condition of his coat.

Because the dog has lots of skin and folds, these folds will need to be washed and kept clean as grime can collect.

While you're busy attending to his skin check his nails too and check inside and outside his ears for signs of redness and irritation.

Diet:

Puppies use up more energy than mature adults, requiring a diet of good quality protein. Dogs that have been spayed or neutered will require less calories as will senior dogs.

Korean Mastiffs require high quality nutrition, and if its dry kibble, make sure its the best brand. Mix in some home-made food such as cooked chicken, brown rice and vegetables from time to time as well as some raw meat occasionally.

Protein and fat from good sources are top ingredients for your Korean Mastiff. Avoid food with allergens such as corn and wheat, sweeteners, preservatives and colorants.

Make sure your large pet has constant access to fresh water.

Characteristics

Doesn’t matter what your Mixed breed dog looks like – he is a unique individual and you can never really predict what kind of a character he will turn out to be.

He might inherit a bit of placid behavior from one parent and a bit of clownish behavior from the other. It’s what makes them so special.

Ask most dog lovers who have owned a mixed breed and you will usually hear them say that they wouldn’t trade their amazing loyal and devoted pet for all the money in the world.

korean mastiff dogsYour huge Korean Mastiff is a good natured dog who isn’t aggressive. He loves being with his human family and makes a particularly good pet when he has been trained and socialized.

He likes a firm but fair owner who takes a leader-of-the-pack role. In spite of his largeness and sluggishness, he can be quite agile and makes a good watchdog too.

All round, the Korean Mastiff, known as a gentle giant, is capable of making you a splendidly friendly, loving canine companion.

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