Native American Indian Dog vs Dogo Sardesco - Breed Comparison

Native American Indian Dog vs Dogo SardescoNative American Indian Dog is originated from United States but Dogo Sardesco is originated from Italy. Native American Indian Dog may grow 34 cm / 13 inches shorter than Dogo Sardesco. Native American Indian Dog may weigh 75 kg / 166 pounds more than Dogo Sardesco. Native American Indian Dog may live 7 years more than Dogo Sardesco. Both Native American Indian Dog and Dogo Sardesco has almost same litter size. Native American Indian Dog requires High maintenance. But Dogo Sardesco requires Low maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Working dog
Working dog
Origin:
United States
Italy
Height Male:
23 - 34 cm
9 - 14 inches
56 - 68 cm
22 - 27 inches
Height Female:
20 - 30 cm
7 - 12 inches
56 - 68 cm
22 - 27 inches
Weight Male:
55 - 120 kg
121 - 265 pounds
30 - 45 kg
66 - 100 pounds
Weight Female:
50 - 100 kg
110 - 221 pounds
30 - 45 kg
66 - 100 pounds
Life Span:
14 - 19 Years
10 - 12 Years
Litter Size:
4 - 10
4 - 8
Size:
Large dog
Large dog
Other Names:
NAID Carolina Dog, the Dingo Dog, the Dixie Dingo, the Native American Dog, the Southern Aboriginal Dog, and “Old Yaller,”, the North American Native Dog
Dogo Sardo, Sardinian Mastiff, Sardinian Molosser
Colors Available:
often with a broken or tortoiseshell pattern, silver to black
black, brown, grey or brindle , Red
Coat:
plush, dense 2 layer/ can be long haired or regular hair coated
Short, smooth, dense
Shedding:
Seasonal
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Independent, Intelligent, Loyal, Protective, Stubborn
Affectionate, Aggressive, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
High maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Moderate
Moderate
Hypoallergenic:
Yes
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
No
New Owners Friendly:
No
No

History

native american indian dogThe Native American Indian Dog is an ancient breed, that some consider to be feral. It is a landrace breed that developed with the indigenous peoples North America. These dogs originally looked and sounded like wolves and it is likely that their ancestry is tied to wolves crossed with pre-Columbian American dogs that came to the America’s with the first peoples. There are some that believe the Native American Indian Dog is a connecting line back to the dogs or wolves that over 12,000 years ago were the first to be domesticated by human beings.

They are now a rare breed in the wild and a small group of domesticated dogs. Fossil studies in recent years suggests that the Native American Indian Dogs came to North America about 4500 years after the first indigenous peoples. It is believed that the Native Americans bred the dogs that traders and explorers brought with them to the native coyote as well. This created a breed specific to North America and called the Common Native Dog or the Common Indian Dog. The original NAID was a mix of many different breeds of dogs and wild canines.

Today’s NAID is said to be raised on Indian reservations in the United State and represent a mix of Chinook, Husky, German Shepherd Dog and Malamute, along with perhaps some of today’s wolf mixed in. This dog is raised domestically and is socialized to life with humans. They are the last remaining breed from all the Native North American dogs that lived with the original people of the Americas. They are also thought to have an ancestry similar to the Australian Dingo.

They are a devoted, protective and loyal breed though they tend to be shy. They need to be outside for the majority of the day and don’t do well in crates. They need a fenced yard and room to roam. They are working dogs that hunted, pulled sleds and guarded their homes. They still need a job to so.

Today the North American Indian Dog is being bred to replicate the temperament and appearance of the originals. Although there are many breeders working from the founding breeder with original stock, there are only six that are officially given authorization to breed the NAID. They are registered by Terra Pines with the National Kennel Club but not recognized by the AKC and UKC.

The breed name NAID is trademarked by Karen Markel of Majestic View Kennels in the 1990’s. Today the breed is nationally recognized as a breed very much like the original Native American dogs, The breed is intelligent and quite healthy. They enjoy people and engage in many companion activities.

Whatever its true ancestry the current Native American Indian Dog (NAID), today’s version is not recognized by the AKC, but they are recognized by the Dog Registry of America, the Native American Indian Dog Registry and the National Kennel Club.

  • DRA = Dog Registry of America, Inc.
  • NAID - Native American Indian Dog Registry
  • NKC - National Kennel Club

dogo sardescoThis is an ancient working dog breed which hails from the Italian island of Sardinia. When you do research, you find that no one is sure as to this dogs exact origin, and there are a number of theories as to how the dog developed.

Regardless of how the Dogo Sardesco came about, it is a valued companion of farmers in Sardinia, being appreciated for its protective nature.

The dog is a kind of Molosser or Mastiff dog. In the past the dog has been used as a working and hunting dog, and today he is a popular dog in mainland Italy. He is also known as Sardinian Mastiff, Sardinian Molosser and Dogo Sardo.

The Dogo Sardesco isn’t recognized today by international kennel clubs, and breeders on the island of Sardinia have done nothing to form a breed club for the dog.

Description

native american indian dog puppyThere are two sizes of the North American Indian Dog – they are medium and large. They have dense short double coats, or they have long top coats and a fairly dense undercoat. They come in a variety of colors mostly black or silver but there is also a tortoiseshell. These tortoiseshell colored dogs are considered by Native Americans to be sacred beings. These tortoiseshell dogs are strikingly good looking and are called Spirit Dog.

They all have the look of a Siberian Husky or Alaskan Malamute with upright ears and almond shaped eyes that are anywhere from amber to brown with some blue. Usually their tails are down and long but can be curled. They resemble the wolf and have that wild, feral appearance. They can be as large as over one hundred pounds or average seventy to eighty pounds. They are strong, alert and intelligent. They are considered to be hypoallergenic, shedding their coat only once a year.

dogo sardesco puppyThe dog Sardesco is a medium to large sized dog generally measuring 56 to 68 cm at the withers and weighing roughly 30 to 45 kg.

Because the dog isn’t bred to specific standards, it varies in appearance, but it is a powerful looking dog, being lean and athletic. The dog’s tail is traditionally docked, but with tail docking being frowned upon, the tail is left long and the dog loses its distinctive look.

The head of the dog is large and the ears are also traditionally cropped to be very short. Left naturally, the ears fold down closely to the sides of the head.The eyes are small and amber colored. The coat is short and smooth, but thick, and while it comes in many colors, the more regular color is red, brown, black, grey or brindle.

Temperament:

The Dogo Sardesco becomes a loyal family pet, more so when he has been trained and socialized. Although he is a devoted and affectionate dog, forming particularly strong bonds with his human family, he isn’t recommended for homes where there are young children.

He also doesn’t take too kindly to other pets in the home. This is because they are a strong-willed, dominant breed and might therefore not be a good choice for first-time dog owners.

Because Sardinian breeders have focused on developing an aggressive dog, he has become a dog suspicious of- and aloof with strangers. He is stubborn and self-willed, and to make him more obedient and amicable, he will require training and socialization. He is an alert, intelligent dog and this makes him an excellent watch dog.

The Sardinian Mastiff is an active dog too and won’t do well in a home where the people aren’t interested in exercise. He is the kind of dog that will need to be taken with you on walks, and he will love to spend time running alongside you when you go running or cycling.

He won’t adapt too well to life in the city, particularly when there is just a tiny garden.

Health Problems

native american indian dog dogThis is a fairly healthy, long lived breed having spent so much of its history in isolation. They are prone to some of the issues that affect all medium to large breeds.

  • Hip and elbow Dysplasia – can lead to lameness and arthritis.
  • Too fast growth causing joint issues – also can lead to lameness and arthritis.

  • Bloat – as with all large dogs this can be fatal.

dogo sardesco dogThe Dogo Sardesco is a relatively healthy breed who is unlikely to suffer with ailments common to dogs, but nonetheless there are some diseases or conditions that you might want to be aware of with your dog.

Skeletal and visual problems can occur in this breed. Both hip- and elbow dysplasia are common orthopedic disorders in dogs and they can cause a lot of pain and discomfort and even cause lifelong disability.

Genes and environmental factors play a part in your dog developing this disease.If he has been diagnosed as having hip or elbow dysplasia, get your dog to the vet as there are treatments which can at least make your pet a lot more comfortable.

Remember that feeding your puppy Dogo Sardesco too much food which is particularly high in calories can mean him growing too fast, and this can contribute to this hip dysplasia problem.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

native american indian dog puppiesBecause of their propensity to grow to quickly the puppy should only stay on puppy food for 8-10 months. Feed them a high quality large dog puppy food 3-4 times daily for a total of 2-21/2 cups per day.

Feeding the adult

Feed a high protein, large dog dry food twice a day for a total of two cups. Do not over feed. Do not feed right before or after exercise do to the risk of bloat.

Points for Good Health

Healthy, strong long lived dog.

Games and Exercises

This is not an indoor, couch potato dog. They need exercise and they need space. They won’t do well as apartment dogs unless you can take them to a dog park for over an hour every day. They really need a large fenced in yard. They don’t do well in crates either. He doesn’t understand crates and thinks you are punishing him. They make great hunters, search and rescue dogs, service dogs and therapy dogs. They will succeed at pulling competitions and weight competitions.

dogo sardesco puppiesDog owners who don’t like the idea of spending too much money on grooming will appreciate that the Dogo Sardesco is a very low maintenance breed, and that a good brushing twice a week will keep the dog’s coat shiny and healthy.

As with all other dogs, he will need to have his teeth brushed to remove plaque build up. Not only does plaque lead to dental disease, but bad teeth can lead to other health issues too.

Nail clipping will also be necessary if your pet doesn’t wear the nails down naturally from getting to run on a hard surface from time to time.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

native american indian dog dogsThis breed is gentle and loving with children.

Special talents

Endurance, strength and good health.

Adaptability

Low adaptability to small living spaces and lack of outside space; don’t do well in crates and need an experienced dog owner.

Learning ability

They are highly intelligent, love to learn and are just a little stubborn.

dogo sardesco dogsThe Dogo Sardesco has always performed his role as a working dog well, and this is a reliable watch dog as well as the dog takes his job of guarding his human family seriously.

With his aggressive temperament, he has appeared on the list of banned breeds, and this is why he isn’t an ideal choice for homes where there are small children, as some small children haven’t been taught how to treat a dog with respect.

However, when properly trained and socialized he becomes an excellent companion dog. He has an intimidating look about him, but when he is with his human family, another side comes out and he is affectionate, loving and protective.

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