Ibizan Hound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Ibizan Hound is originated from Spain but Borzoi is originated from Bosnia and Herzegovina. Ibizan Hound may grow 11 cm / 4 inches shorter than Borzoi. Ibizan Hound may weigh 18 kg / 39 pounds lesser than Borzoi. Both Ibizan Hound and Borzoi has almost same life span. Both Ibizan Hound and Borzoi has almost same litter size. Ibizan Hound requires Low maintenance. But Borzoi requires Moderate maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Hound dog
Hound dog
Origin:
Spain
Bosnia and Herzegovina
Height Male:
56 - 74 cm
22 - 30 inches
75 - 85 cm
29 - 34 inches
Height Female:
50 - 68 cm
19 - 27 inches
66 - 83 cm
25 - 33 inches
Weight Male:
20 - 29 kg
44 - 64 pounds
34 - 47 kg
74 - 104 pounds
Weight Female:
17 - 26 kg
37 - 58 pounds
25 - 45 kg
55 - 100 pounds
Life Span:
10 - 12 Years
7 - 10 Years
Litter Size:
6 - 12
1 - 11
Size:
Large dog
Large dog
Other Names:
Ibizan Warren HoundPodenco Ibicenco, Balearic Dog, Ca Eivissenc
Russian Wolfhound Russian Hunting Sighthound Russkaya Psovaya Borzaya
Colors Available:
red and white
Any colour – tan, white, black or a mix such as sandy and white or tan and white.
Coat:
short and hard
Long, silky, wavy or curly
Shedding:
Moderate
Moderate, Seasonal
Temperament:
Alert, Energetic, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Outgoing, Playful, Quiet
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Docile, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Sweet
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Moderate maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

This lean, speedy and agile hound dog looks and acts very much like a Pharaoh Hound except the Ibizan Hound is larger and a different color. The image of dogs that look like the Ibizan have been seen since 3400 BC in Egypt. The dogs were probably brought by sailors to Ibiza and surrounding islands. They came about 700-900 BC. It is believed that they actually came for the island of Elvissa and Spain, where they speak Catalan. It was also known in France as the le chanigue. There job was the same. To hunt rabbits.

They were fast hunting greyhound type dogs. They hunted for rabbit for the Ibizaners and themselves. These dogs hunt by day and by night. They are not just sight hounds, they also hunt by smell and hearing, in packs or by themselves. They use their sight to find and corner the prey. Then they act like retrievers and bring it back to the hunter. Their function and look is very similar to several other dogs such as the Pharaoh Hound, the Greyhound, the Portuguese Podengo, the Cimeco dellEtna and the Podence Canario. The Ibizan is larger than any of these, but all these breeds are considered to be “primitive”.

Within the breed itself there are smooth, wire and longhaired Ibizan Hounds. The Smooth is by far the most common. A great jumper, nimble runner built for stamina, the Ibizan Hound was just what the island people needed. The breed lived in isolation on the island for many centuries, under a variety of rulers including the Romans, Egyptians, Vandals, Carthaginians, Chaldeans, Arabs and Spanish. Because of the harsh island conditions, the farmers only allowed the best hunters among the Ibizan Hounds to procreate thus assuring a breed that is unchanged from ancient stock.

By 1950 the Ibizan Hound was brought to America. Because this dog is not a pet but a working machine, it took awhile for the breed to become popular enough to be recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) in 1979. Still the Ibizan Hound is a rare breed with the female being a better hunter than the male. One of the most common activities of this breed in the U.S. is lure coursing. These events are sponsored by AKC and ASFA as well as racing events in the NOTRA and LGRA.

Developed in Russia and also known as the Russian Wolfhound, the Borzoi was used to hunt wolf in the country. By 1873 there were only a few Borzoi which remained, and the Imperial Association was created to protect this graceful, elegant dog. They were often presented to European nobility as gifts, and thanks to a few dedicated breeders, the breed was saved from extinction and exported to other parts of the world. He was imported to the UK in the late 19th century, and it was Princess Alexandra who did a lot to increase the dog’s popularity in Britain.

The tall, slender, elegant dog was recognized by the AKC in 1891. The Borzoi Club of America, which started off being known as the Russian Wolfhound Club was formed but in 1936 the name was changed to Borzoi. The Russian world ‘Borzoi’ is a term used to encompass all Sight Hounds. Today he is no longer used for hunting but is a gentle companion.

Description

The breed is agile, elegant, athletic and graceful. At the same time the Ibizan Hound is a fierce hunter travelling at unreal speeds to catch his rabbit prey. They are a hardy breed with a lean and long neck, and a lean, muscled body with laid back shoulders. The ears are specific to the breed, with a broad base leading to long, beautiful ears. They have tan eye rims, nose, foot pads, and ears. The eyes themselves are an amber with an intelligent and alert expression.

Tall and Graceful to the Eye

The Borzoi’s silky coat is longer with the male dogs than with the females. The height of these tall graceful dogs is 68 to 74cm. You’ll find that the Borzoi’s back is quite bony and it rises in a curve. He has a tall, lean body and a long, narrow head to match with small, thin ears which rest backwards towards the neck.The silky coat comes in a number of colors - tan, white, black or a mix such as sandy and white or tan and white. The coat is often wavy or slightly curly. The soft undercoat becomes thick in the Winter and he sheds this hair in hotter weather. You’ll find the coat frills on the neck and there is feathering on the hindquarters and with the long tail.

Sweet and Gentle

The Borzoi is a gentle, sweet dog, to such an extent that they don’t make good watch-dogs. He is good with other pets and children, although he isn’t the kind of dog to indulge in games with children. He doesn’t bark much and he is also not a high-energy dog, being fairly happy to make himself at home indoors. This is a faithful, loyal and courageous dog.

His temperament is quiet, sensitive, intelligent and somewhat aloof. Even though he has these quiet characteristics, he will still need training and socialization as this just rounds your dog off, making him a pleasure to have around.

Health Problems

Despite being isolated on the islands for all those years, the Ibizan Hound has several tendencies toward medical issues:

  • Allergic Reactions -insecticides, drugs and flea powders.
  • Seizures – can be medicated.
  • Axonal Dystrophy – a muscle and nerve disease.
  • Cataracts – occasional occurrence.
  • Retinal Dysplasia – occurs rarely
  • Deafness – can be at birth or developmental.

The Borzoi is a healthy dog, and you’re not likely to be taking him to the veterinarian often but you do need to know about illnesses which are more prevalent in these large breed dogs.

Osteosarcoma

This is a common bone tumor found in dogs and it is more commonly found in large breeds. It can spread quickly to other parts of the body, and although there are treatments, the long term prognosis isn’t good. Your dog will have pain and swelling.

Lymphosarcoma

Lymphosarcoma is a common cancer diagnosed in dogs. It is a cancer of lymphocytes and the average dog gets it from 6 years on. Some dogs may not necessarily feel sick, while others are tired, they don’t eat, they lose weight and may have diarrhea.

Bloat

This is a disease that can be deadly for your dog. Known as gastric dilatation, the stomach twists and fills with gas, putting pressure on the diaphragm, and creating breathing problems. Bloat is more common in large breeds and its up to you as a responsible dog owner to watch out for a swollen stomach with drooling and attempts to vomit.

Remember that some health problems are inherited, but there are other health problems that can be prevented by the way you treat- and raise your dog.

Caring The Pet

Feeding the puppy

Your Ibizan Hound is an athlete and needs to be fed like one. As a puppy he needs high quality breed or group (hound) specific food. Feed her 3-4 times a day based on calories. A puppy needs about 866 calories each day.

Feeding the adult

If your dog participates in sports as adults, they need between 1450 and 2900 calories each day. The exact amount depends on how much activity the dog is engaged in. Feed at least 2 times a day.

Points for Good Health

Great speed and stamina

Games and Exercises

Your Ibizan Hound is a working athlete. He needs a lot of exercise and he needs a chance to run full out so access to land is essential. It can be a large back yard, or it can be a dog park. No matter what it is, it is essential for the Ibizan Hound. She will also require long walks at least a couple times a day. However, do not over exercise your puppy. They are great jumpers as well as runners.

The sport of lure coursing was made for the Ibizan in the same way that it was made for the Greyhound. They are good at Flyball and agility as well.

Shedding and the Coat

Long coated dogs shed, and the Borzoi female sheds after her season and the males shed annually. Once the female is spayed, she sheds like the males. You will need to be brushing your Borzoi every day to rid the dogs of this loose hair.

The Teeth

Borzoi teeth collect tartar, more so than with other breeds, so their teeth will need to be brushed at least 3 times a week with special dog toothbrushes and toothpaste to prevent gum and tooth problems.

Food

Good quality food is the foundation for good health with your pet. Home-made food is always good for your dog and should include meat, rice and vegetables. Apart from top quality commercially manufactured food for large breed dogs and recommended by your vet, make sure to include some raw meat into your Borzoi’s diet too. This is imperative to stave off ill health and skin problems. Make sure he has a constant supply of fresh, cool water available to him.

Characteristics

Children friendliness

They love children but be careful they do not knock them over and don’t let the children play to rough.

Special talents

Exceptional jumping ability, speed and stamina.

Adaptability

Must have a large fenced yard and a place to run full out.

Learning ability

Very intelligent with excellent learning ability.

If you’re looking for a quiet, amicable, elegant breed, you’ll love the big Russian Borzoi, known for his gentleness, sweetness and gracefulness. He is a friendly dog with his human family, although not too keen on children with their boisterous games. It is his gentleness however, that has endeared him to so many dog lovers.

Even though he isn’t one of the most active dogs, he will still need exercise and a walk as he is a big dog used to wide, open spaces. He’ll need the opportunity every now and then to simply run.

He makes a wonderful pet for new- or seasoned pet owners, and if you’re looking for a quiet, devoted companion, why not welcome an elegant, graceful Borzoi into your home?

Comparison with other breeds

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  30. Saluki vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
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  33. Borzoi vs American English Coonhound - Breed Comparison
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  35. Borzoi vs Azawakh - Breed Comparison
  36. Black and Tan Coonhound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  37. Mountain Cur vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
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  39. Plott Hound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  40. Petit Gascon Saintongeois vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  41. Otterhound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  42. Mudhol Hound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  43. Rampur Greyhound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  44. Galgo Espanol vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  45. Hanover Hound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  46. Majestic Tree Hound vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
  47. Chart Polski vs Borzoi - Breed Comparison
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