Porcelaine vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison

Porcelaine is originated from France but Australian Kelpie is originated from Australia. Porcelaine may grow 7 cm / 3 inches higher than Australian Kelpie. Porcelaine may weigh 8 kg / 18 pounds more than Australian Kelpie. Both Porcelaine and Australian Kelpie has almost same life span. Both Porcelaine and Australian Kelpie has almost same litter size. Porcelaine requires Low maintenance. But Australian Kelpie requires Moderate maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Working dog
Working dog
Origin:
France
Australia
Height Male:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
46 - 51 cm
18 - 21 inches
Height Female:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
43 - 48 cm
16 - 19 inches
Weight Male:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
14 - 20 kg
30 - 45 pounds
Weight Female:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
12 - 20 kg
26 - 45 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 14 Years
12 - 15 Years
Litter Size:
3 - 6
4 - 7
Size:
Medium dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
Chien de Franche-Comté
Kelpie, Barb
Colors Available:
White with orange color ears
Many Colours, from solids to bi-colours - tan, fawn, blue, red, black, chocolate
Coat:
Short and smooth
short and dense
Shedding:
Minimal
Moderate
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Docile, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Moderate maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

porcelaineThe Porcelaine is an attractive dog hailing from France. It is thought to be the oldest of the French scent hounds.

The dog also goes by the name of Chien de Franche-Comté. The dogs were developed for hunting purposes. It is believed to be an ancient dog breed, dating way back to the 1700s.

It is thought that dogs used to bring about the Porcelain are the Talbot Hound, the English Harrier, the Montaimboeuf, as well as some smaller Laufhunds of Switzerland.

The Club du Porcelaine was established in France in 1971 and the breed was recognized by the FCI in 1975. It is a rare breed virtually unknown outside of France.

The energetic Kelpie came into being around 1870, with this working dog breed having a role to play with the herding of sheep in the harsh Australian outback.The sheep and wool industry in Australia has always been big business, and Australian ranchers were looking for a tough dog that could cope with sheep but also cope with the harsh environment.

These are adaptable dogs too and their ancestors include the Coley or Collie, a British herding-type dog, the English- and the Australian Shepherd and the Dingo. In fact it is believed that up to 4% of their genes comes from the Dingo. These adaptable dogs were also brought to North America where they quickly adapted to the different climate and different livestock.

The Australian Kelpie isn’t your regular pet as they are essentially an outdoor, working dog. They are recognized today by the United Kennel Club and registered by the North American Australian Kelpie Registry.

Description

porcelaine puppyThe Porcelaine has got such a gentle, amicable face that he looks like he wouldn’t hurt a fly.

His interesting name comes from the fact that he has a shiny, gleaming single coat that looks like white porcelain.

He has a distinguished look to him with his slender neck, slender head with longish muzzle. The body is well proportioned, lean and muscular. Another noticeable feature of this dog is the long, floppy ears which can have a hint of orange. His nose is black and he has dark eyes and a long tail. He is a medium sized dog standing at between 53 to 58cm in height and weighs about 25 to 28kg.

Temperament:

Elegant and beautiful, the Porcelaine isn’t your usual looking dog. He is amicable and easy-going and always ready for a pat on the silky head.

His temperament, kindly and easy going, makes him the perfect pet for therapy purposes and for search and rescue work. He is a quiet, well behaved dog, indoors and out.  He is an energetic dog and loves nothing more than a hunt and he has a keen sense of smell.

He loves being outdoors but is such a good friend of yours he can happily turn into a couch potato to be by your side.

The Coat

The Kelpie is a medium-sized dog with a coat that comes in a number of colours – black, chocolate, fawn, red, blue, tan, white and gold. . The nose colour blends in with the dog’s coat colour and can be black, brownish and even pinkish.

A Sharp, Intelligent Look

The Kelpie has a medium-length tail which is low-set. The ears are pricked, giving the dog an intelligent, alert appearance. The dog’s head is also narrow and long, and his eyes are bright and inquisitive.

Lithe and Athletic

The Australian Kelpie has an athletic appearance, with a body which is longer than their height, similar to that of a German Shepherd. Because the Australian Kelpie is such an energetic, active breed, he’ll need plenty of ‘jobs to do’, lots of ball games and other exercise to keep him free from boredom and to ensure he maintains his lithe, lean, muscular limbs.

Health Problems

porcelaine dogThe Porcelaine has so many good features, and good health is one. He is described as a truly healthy breed that can easily reach up to 14 years of age with good care.

As a Porcelaine owner, look out for some of the more common heath conditions such as cancer, bloat and skin infections.

Hip Dysplasia:

A working, hunting type dog such as the Porcelaine can be devastated with hip dysplasia. It’s a disease that can be genetically passed on and if your dog has it,it should be spayed or neutered. The condition, where your pet becomes more and more reluctant to participate in exercise can be painful and debilitating.

There are different treatments available for pain relief and mobility.

Ear Infections:

The long, floppy ears of the Porcelaine can result in a tendency towards ear infections. Ear infections can be painful and frustrating and you’ll see your dog scratching his ears and shaking his head. The ears may be red inside and there may even be a discharge. Don’t allow your pet to suffer and get him to the vet.

A Healthy Breed

Your Australian Kelpie is a hardy breed and you won’t find many health problems with him. Yes, every dog is susceptible to illnesses which are common with all dog breeds, and these are illnesses such as hip dysplasia and cryptorchidism.

You will need to check your Kelpie out for eye disease such as PRA or Progressive Retinal Atrophy, a group of genetic diseases which are found in some breeds of dogs. This can lead to cataracts and blindness.

Lifestyle and Environment Impact Health

Health problems in your Australian Kelpie can certainly be partially prevented by the way you feed your dog and by the environment you provide him with. Every dog has the potential to develop genetic health problems, but as we’ve said, the Kelpie is a generally healthy breed.

Always find a reputable breeder whose focus is on breeding healthy dogs and who can provide certification that the parents of the dog are clear of defects and are in tip-top condition for breeding.

Puppy Vaccinations

Along with quality food and fresh water, getting your puppy vaccinated is hugely important. Australian Kelpie puppy shots will protect your new 4-legged family member from the likes of distemper, parvovirus and hepatitis. Your puppy will also need additional booster vaccinations after his first shots which start at around 8 weeks of age.

Caring The Pet

Exercise:

porcelaine puppiesPorcelaines have a very high activity level and require lots of exercise - ball games and walks. Because of this, they aren't recommended for people living in small homes in the city. He will ideally suit life on a big property.

Grooming:

The Porcelaine Dog is a single coated dog with very short hair and is looked upon as being pretty low maintenance.

Apart from brushing him twice a week, to keep the coat shiny and healthy, wipe him down with a hound mitt to get rid of loose hairs and to remove dust.

Because of the long, floppy ears, clean the insides very gently to avoid dirt, moisture and wax buildup. There are veterinarian-recommended ear cleansers, but if you don’t like the idea of doing it yourself, the vet or groomer will do it for you when you take him to have his nails clipped.

Diet:

Your beautiful Porcelaine dog needs the very best food there is so as to ensure he remains the healthy, shiny, lean specimen he is.

He can live a long, healthy life if you choose quality dog food packed with the right mix of vitamins and minerals. If you buy commercially manufactured dog food for him, it needs to be the high quality ones to ensure its properly formulated.

Your Porcelaine, like any other dog, wants consistency and simplicity. Home-made food is always an excellent choice for your pet’s diet. Boiled chicken, brown rice or pasta and spinach, sweet potatoes and carrots can be very healthy for him.

Chop it up and add it into the dry kibble a couple of times a week. Its providing him with some variety from the dry kibble and gives him a tasty treat.

Some raw meat added in occasionally will also ensure his coat and eyes remain bright and vibrant. Always make sure he has access to fresh, cool water.

Grooming

Australian Kelpies are low maintenance and their coat is easy to groom and maintain. You want to give him a good brush twice a week to get rid of loose hair. Australian Kelpies are moderate shedders.

Feeding your Kelpie

It is important to get your puppy off on the right foot to avoid health problems later on. Homemade dog food which includes chicken, rice and vegetables is always the best food for your dog. If you can't prepared your own meals for your Kelpie, top grade commercial dog food brands are recommended.

When looking at dog foods, remember that your Kelpie is a working dog – a naturally active breed and you’ll need to look at dog food which has been specially formulated for active dogs. Every dog will need raw meat in their diet if you want to avoid a dog with an itchy, flaky skin, a dog with poor energy levels and a dog that has no resistance to infection.

Training

Every owner who cares for their dog will provide him with socialization and training. The Australian Kelpie is an intelligent breed who responds well to training.

Characteristics

porcelaine dogsThe Porcelaine is a working, hunting dog but he is more than willing to become a companion animal, being loving and loyal to his human family.

He is a balanced, kind natured dog and can get on well with children and with pets in the home.

He enjoys his human family, and typical of hounds he is friendly, energetic and amusing. Bring this beautiful white dog into your home and start a wonderful, long, loving friendship with him.

Friend of Children

The Australian Kelpie is an active, busy, intelligent, loving breed who is highly protective of his human family. He gets on well with children and other pets in the home but you’ll want him trained if you want him to be gentle around children and smaller pets. He does tend to gravitate towards one particular family member as his ‘favourite’ though.

He Must be Busy

Your Kelpie won't do well in an apartment as he is a working dog who wants plenty of place to run and play. If he is bored, it manifests itself with constant barking. Make sure to provide a stimulating, active lifestyle for your Australian Kelpie, provide him with everything a dog needs and you’ll be rewarded with a devoted and loyal companion.

Comparison with other breeds

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  29. Alaskan Husky vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  30. Catahoula Leopard vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  31. German Pinscher vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  32. Portuguese Water Dog vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  33. Puli vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  34. Griffon Bleu de Gascogne vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  35. Borador vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  36. German Spaniel vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  37. Canadian Eskimo Dog vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  38. McNab vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  39. Finnish Lapphund vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  40. Berger Blanc Suisse vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  41. Griffon Nivernais vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  42. Hokkaido vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  43. Petit Bleu de Gascogne vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  44. Pumi vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  45. Australian Kelpie vs Aidi - Breed Comparison
  46. Griffon Fauve de Bretagne vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  47. Basque Shepherd vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  48. Istrian Sheepdog vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  49. Jamthund vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison

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