Porcelaine vs Istrian Sheepdog - Breed Comparison

Porcelaine is originated from France but Istrian Sheepdog is originated from Slovenia. Both Porcelaine and Istrian Sheepdog are having almost same height. Porcelaine may weigh 12 kg / 26 pounds lesser than Istrian Sheepdog. Both Porcelaine and Istrian Sheepdog has almost same life span. Both Porcelaine and Istrian Sheepdog has same litter size. Porcelaine requires Low maintenance. But Istrian Sheepdog requires Moderate maintenance

Basic Information

Group:
Working dog
Working dog
Origin:
France
Slovenia
Height Male:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
54 - 63 cm
21 - 25 inches
Height Female:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
54 - 63 cm
21 - 25 inches
Weight Male:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
26 - 40 kg
57 - 89 pounds
Weight Female:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
26 - 40 kg
57 - 89 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 14 Years
10 - 12 Years
Litter Size:
3 - 6
3 - 6
Size:
Medium dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
Chien de Franche-Comté
Karst Sheepdog
Colors Available:
White with orange color ears
Dark and Light shades of Grey
Coat:
Short and smooth
Long, thick and harsh
Shedding:
Minimal
Moderate, Seasonal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Docile, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Affectionate, Aggressive, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Moderate maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

The Porcelaine is an attractive dog hailing from France. It is thought to be the oldest of the French scent hounds.

The dog also goes by the name of Chien de Franche-Comté. The dogs were developed for hunting purposes. It is believed to be an ancient dog breed, dating way back to the 1700s.

It is thought that dogs used to bring about the Porcelain are the Talbot Hound, the English Harrier, the Montaimboeuf, as well as some smaller Laufhunds of Switzerland.

The Club du Porcelaine was established in France in 1971 and the breed was recognized by the FCI in 1975. It is a rare breed virtually unknown outside of France.

Known also as the Karst Sheepdog, the beautiful, medium sized Istrian Sheepdog hails from Slovenia, Yugoslavia in the 1600s, being used to guard sheep. In fact, the Karst Shepherd was recognized as the Illyrian Shepherd in 1939.

The dog is fairly scarce in his own country, but interest in the dog started developing in the late 1970s. The Fédération Cynologique Internationale recognizes the breed and it has also been exported to the United States, being recognized by the United Kennel Club.

It is also recognized by a number of smaller kennel clubs. The dogs numbers have declined at certain periods in its history but fortunately breeding programs boosted its numbers.

Description

The Porcelaine has got such a gentle, amicable face that he looks like he wouldn’t hurt a fly.

His interesting name comes from the fact that he has a shiny, gleaming single coat that looks like white porcelain.

He has a distinguished look to him with his slender neck, slender head with longish muzzle. The body is well proportioned, lean and muscular. Another noticeable feature of this dog is the long, floppy ears which can have a hint of orange. His nose is black and he has dark eyes and a long tail. He is a medium sized dog standing at between 53 to 58cm in height and weighs about 25 to 28kg.

Temperament:

Elegant and beautiful, the Porcelaine isn’t your usual looking dog. He is amicable and easy-going and always ready for a pat on the silky head.

His temperament, kindly and easy going, makes him the perfect pet for therapy purposes and for search and rescue work. He is a quiet, well behaved dog, indoors and out.  He is an energetic dog and loves nothing more than a hunt and he has a keen sense of smell.

He loves being outdoors but is such a good friend of yours he can happily turn into a couch potato to be by your side.

This is a medium sized, muscled, strong dog with an iron-grey coat that has shades of deeper grey. His beautiful coat is long, thick and fairly harsh to the touch, with the undercoat protecting the dog against cold weather.

Around the neck area the hair is longer, forming an eye-catching-like mane. The stomach area has longer hair too. He has a noble look about him with kind, brown eyes and a round skull. The muzzle of the dog is dark, the limbs long and muscular and the tail is long and covered in thick fur.

The dog is slightly longer than its height, and both males and females stand at 54 to 63cm in height and weigh between 26 and 40kg. The long tail reaches right down to the hocks. The ears of the dog are fairly short and are floppy.

Temperament:

This dog has always made an excellent guard dog, being alert and also being distrustful of strangers. He will need to be trained and socialized if you want him to be obedient to you and more amicable around children in the home as well as visitors to the home.

If he is trained and well socialized, he is able to make a good pet. However, he is an energetic dog, used to working and he isn't recommended for life in the city if there is only a tiny garden. He needs space and will require a large garden.

He will also need to be exercised and not just left to his own devices in the backyard. Because he is essentially a working dog he doesn’t easily fit into the role of pet and companion. He is a working dog and will need to be kept busy.

Health Problems

The Porcelaine has so many good features, and good health is one. He is described as a truly healthy breed that can easily reach up to 14 years of age with good care.

As a Porcelaine owner, look out for some of the more common heath conditions such as cancer, bloat and skin infections.

Hip Dysplasia:

A working, hunting type dog such as the Porcelaine can be devastated with hip dysplasia. It’s a disease that can be genetically passed on and if your dog has it,it should be spayed or neutered. The condition, where your pet becomes more and more reluctant to participate in exercise can be painful and debilitating.

There are different treatments available for pain relief and mobility.

Ear Infections:

The long, floppy ears of the Porcelaine can result in a tendency towards ear infections. Ear infections can be painful and frustrating and you’ll see your dog scratching his ears and shaking his head. The ears may be red inside and there may even be a discharge. Don’t allow your pet to suffer and get him to the vet.

As with many other dog breeds, the Istrian Sheepdog is a healthy dog that, because of history of hard work, is robust and able to stand up well to common dog illnesses.

However there is one dog illness that strikes many dogs and at any age, and it is hip dysplasia. This is a malformation of the hip joints.

You'll notice that your once active dog is lethargic, doesn't want to play so much anymore and battles to get up after lying down. The disease is painful for your dog and it can lead to mobility issues. The disease is diagnosed with x-rays and your vet will recommend treatment options to make life more comfortable and less painful for your beloved pet.

Caring The Pet

Exercise:

Porcelaines have a very high activity level and require lots of exercise - ball games and walks. Because of this, they aren't recommended for people living in small homes in the city. He will ideally suit life on a big property.

Grooming:

The Porcelaine Dog is a single coated dog with very short hair and is looked upon as being pretty low maintenance.

Apart from brushing him twice a week, to keep the coat shiny and healthy, wipe him down with a hound mitt to get rid of loose hairs and to remove dust.

Because of the long, floppy ears, clean the insides very gently to avoid dirt, moisture and wax buildup. There are veterinarian-recommended ear cleansers, but if you don’t like the idea of doing it yourself, the vet or groomer will do it for you when you take him to have his nails clipped.

Diet:

Your beautiful Porcelaine dog needs the very best food there is so as to ensure he remains the healthy, shiny, lean specimen he is.

He can live a long, healthy life if you choose quality dog food packed with the right mix of vitamins and minerals. If you buy commercially manufactured dog food for him, it needs to be the high quality ones to ensure its properly formulated.

Your Porcelaine, like any other dog, wants consistency and simplicity. Home-made food is always an excellent choice for your pet’s diet. Boiled chicken, brown rice or pasta and spinach, sweet potatoes and carrots can be very healthy for him.

Chop it up and add it into the dry kibble a couple of times a week. Its providing him with some variety from the dry kibble and gives him a tasty treat.

Some raw meat added in occasionally will also ensure his coat and eyes remain bright and vibrant. Always make sure he has access to fresh, cool water.

Exercise:

This is a dog that is used to guarding his flock and he will need to be in a home that has a fair sized garden. He can adapt to life in the city or to the countryside, but wherever he is, he will need sufficient exercise. Take him with you on your walks or hikes and give him some rope- and ball games.

General Care:

Wherever you live in the world, when the Winter winds howl and blow in icy rain or snow, a dog is at an increased risk of illness. You decided to have a dog in your home and it is your responsibility to care for him. Winter weather is downright unpleasant and dangerous for most pets.

Bring your pet in during such weather and provide him with a warm, dry sleeping space. During hot weather, make sure your pet has a cool, shady spot to lie down in, out of the boiling sun. Whatever weather you're experiencing, your pet should never ever be without a constant supply of fresh, cool water.

Provide him with excellent food that is full of vitamins and minerals to keep him healthy. Learn to know what human foods can be toxic for him and cause him digestive problems.

Grooming:

Your double coated Istrian Sheepdog will need a thorough brushing at least twice a week because of his dense, double coat. He does shed and isn't a hypoallergenic dog. His thick coat can tangle easily if it isn't properly brushed and maintained.

Clip his nails when and if they grow long. Other grooming aspects for this attractive dog require checking his ears for infection and also checking his teeth as dental disease can lead to a host of serious illnesses in your dog.

Characteristics

The Porcelaine is a working, hunting dog but he is more than willing to become a companion animal, being loving and loyal to his human family.

He is a balanced, kind natured dog and can get on well with children and with pets in the home.

He enjoys his human family, and typical of hounds he is friendly, energetic and amusing. Bring this beautiful white dog into your home and start a wonderful, long, loving friendship with him.

Your Istrian Sheepdog is a unique, strong-willed dog that is used to guarding, and working and he wants to be kept involved and busy.

He is wary of strangers and makes an excellent guard dog for any family home. Remember that it is never good to invest in a dog purely for guard dog purposes. A dog such as the Istrian Sheepdog is a social creature and he also wants- and needs to be part of a human family that provides him with plenty of interaction with them.

The Istrian Sheepdog is a loyal, loving dog who is capable of forming strong bonds with his human family. With proper training and socialization he makes a good friend of children and the elderly too.

Include him in all your family activities just like any human family member and he will make you a splendid, courageous pet.

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