Porcelaine vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison | MyDogBreeds

Porcelaine is originated from France but German Pinscher is originated from Germany. Porcelaine may grow 8 cm / 4 inches higher than German Pinscher. Porcelaine may weigh 8 kg / 18 pounds more than German Pinscher. Both Porcelaine and German Pinscher has same life span. Both Porcelaine and German Pinscher has almost same litter size. Both Porcelaine and German Pinscher requires Low maintenance.

Basic Information

Group:
Working dog
Working dog
Origin:
France
Germany
Height Male:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
45 - 50 cm
17 - 20 inches
Height Female:
53 - 58 cm
20 - 23 inches
45 - 50 cm
17 - 20 inches
Weight Male:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
14 - 20 kg
30 - 45 pounds
Weight Female:
25 - 28 kg
55 - 62 pounds
14 - 20 kg
30 - 45 pounds
Life Span:
12 - 14 Years
10 - 14 Years
Litter Size:
3 - 6
6 - 8
Size:
Medium dog
Medium dog
Other Names:
Chien de Franche-Comté
Deutscher Pinscher
Colors Available:
White with orange color ears
Black and Tan, Reddish Brown, Brown
Coat:
Short and smooth
Short and smooth
Shedding:
Minimal
Minimal
Temperament:
Affectionate, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Docile, Energetic, Friendly, Gentle, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Quiet, Responsive, Social, Sweet, Territorial
Affectionate, Aggressive, Alert, Cheerful, Courageous, Curious, Energetic, Friendly, Independent, Intelligent, Lively, Loving, Loyal, Outgoing, Playful, Protective, Responsive, Social, Stubborn, Territorial
Grooming:
Low maintenance
Low maintenance
Trainability:
Easy
Easy
Hypoallergenic:
No
No
Kids Friendly:
Yes
Yes
New Owners Friendly:
Yes
Yes

History

porcelaineThe Porcelaine is an attractive dog hailing from France. It is thought to be the oldest of the French scent hounds.

The dog also goes by the name of Chien de Franche-Comté. The dogs were developed for hunting purposes. It is believed to be an ancient dog breed, dating way back to the 1700s.

It is thought that dogs used to bring about the Porcelain are the Talbot Hound, the English Harrier, the Montaimboeuf, as well as some smaller Laufhunds of Switzerland.

The Club du Porcelaine was established in France in 1971 and the breed was recognized by the FCI in 1975. It is a rare breed virtually unknown outside of France.

The German Pinscher or Deutscher Pinscher originates in Germany. When you look at the dog you can see the the Doberman, the Rottweiler, Schnauzer, Affenpinscher and Miniature Pinscher have all played a role in the dog’s development.

There have been drawings of the German Pinscher which have been seen in dog books as early as 1884 and some drawings even earlier than this date. The dogs have descended from early European herding breeds.

The German Pinscher came to breeders of the United States in the 1980s, and the German Pinscher Club of America was started by German Pinscher fanciers, with the dog gaining acceptance by the Canadian Kennel Club in 2000.

Description

porcelaine puppyThe Porcelaine has got such a gentle, amicable face that he looks like he wouldn’t hurt a fly.

His interesting name comes from the fact that he has a shiny, gleaming single coat that looks like white porcelain.

He has a distinguished look to him with his slender neck, slender head with longish muzzle. The body is well proportioned, lean and muscular. Another noticeable feature of this dog is the long, floppy ears which can have a hint of orange. His nose is black and he has dark eyes and a long tail. He is a medium sized dog standing at between 53 to 58cm in height and weighs about 25 to 28kg.

Temperament:

Elegant and beautiful, the Porcelaine isn’t your usual looking dog. He is amicable and easy-going and always ready for a pat on the silky head.

His temperament, kindly and easy going, makes him the perfect pet for therapy purposes and for search and rescue work. He is a quiet, well behaved dog, indoors and out.  He is an energetic dog and loves nothing more than a hunt and he has a keen sense of smell.

He loves being outdoors but is such a good friend of yours he can happily turn into a couch potato to be by your side.

The German Pinscher is a medium sized dog with a square build, looking very much like the Doberman Pinscher we know so well, but slightly smaller. Dogs and bitches stand roughly 45 to 50cm at the withers and the dog weighs between 14 to 20kg.

The dog is lean and muscular with a tight fitting skin. He has a short, smooth coat which can be brown, reddish brown or black and tan. He has a black nose, dark eyes and he has either high set drop ears or the ears are specifically erect.

In fact, with German Pinschers, they have always had their ears cropped and their tails docked, but these days the tail is left and unfortunately that distinctive look is gone.

Temperament:

Energetic, spirited, lively, confident, intelligent, fearless and loyal are just some of the characteristics of this amazing dog who is guaranteed to make you an excellent watchdog and companion.

The German Pinscher is a playful, good natured dog and he’ll make a good pet for households where there are other pets as well as children. He is a loving and loyal companion with an even temperament, although he is strong-willed and stubborn and will therefore need training and socialization. He then becomes a super obedient pet.

He can fit into city- or country life but he is an energetic dog and will certainly require being exercised every day. Like any other dog, he can become bored and frustrated when put into the backyard and left there by himself day after day.

Health Problems

porcelaine dogThe Porcelaine has so many good features, and good health is one. He is described as a truly healthy breed that can easily reach up to 14 years of age with good care.

As a Porcelaine owner, look out for some of the more common heath conditions such as cancer, bloat and skin infections.

Hip Dysplasia:

A working, hunting type dog such as the Porcelaine can be devastated with hip dysplasia. It’s a disease that can be genetically passed on and if your dog has it,it should be spayed or neutered. The condition, where your pet becomes more and more reluctant to participate in exercise can be painful and debilitating.

There are different treatments available for pain relief and mobility.

Ear Infections:

The long, floppy ears of the Porcelaine can result in a tendency towards ear infections. Ear infections can be painful and frustrating and you’ll see your dog scratching his ears and shaking his head. The ears may be red inside and there may even be a discharge. Don’t allow your pet to suffer and get him to the vet.

When you see your German Pinscher standing lean and strong, you can’t think of him ever getting an illness. And yet, even a strong dog like this, who can reach 10 – 14 years of age with good nutrition, can get sick.

Look out for von Willebrand's blood-clotting disorder as well as heart disease and hip dysplasia with your German Pinscher.

Von Willebrand’s Disease:

This is a blood disease where there is a deficiency of von Willebrand Factor which results in the blood not clotting properly. The condition can lead to excessive bleeding with your pet after he has had an injury for instance.

You may notice bleeding from the gums, bloody urine or feces as well as bruising of the skin. Get him to the vet who will perform an examination of your pet.

Remember that some health problems seen in a dog are inherited, and if you can get certificates from the breeders proving that the parents have been cleared of hereditary eye diseases, hip dysplasia and blood clotting disease for instance, your dog will have less risks of developing any of these serious conditions.

Also many illnesses can be eliminated by providing your pet with excellent food, clean water, a warm dry place to sleep and lots of love and attention.

Caring The Pet

Exercise:

porcelaine puppiesPorcelaines have a very high activity level and require lots of exercise - ball games and walks. Because of this, they aren't recommended for people living in small homes in the city. He will ideally suit life on a big property.

Grooming:

The Porcelaine Dog is a single coated dog with very short hair and is looked upon as being pretty low maintenance.

Apart from brushing him twice a week, to keep the coat shiny and healthy, wipe him down with a hound mitt to get rid of loose hairs and to remove dust.

Because of the long, floppy ears, clean the insides very gently to avoid dirt, moisture and wax buildup. There are veterinarian-recommended ear cleansers, but if you don’t like the idea of doing it yourself, the vet or groomer will do it for you when you take him to have his nails clipped.

Diet:

Your beautiful Porcelaine dog needs the very best food there is so as to ensure he remains the healthy, shiny, lean specimen he is.

He can live a long, healthy life if you choose quality dog food packed with the right mix of vitamins and minerals. If you buy commercially manufactured dog food for him, it needs to be the high quality ones to ensure its properly formulated.

Your Porcelaine, like any other dog, wants consistency and simplicity. Home-made food is always an excellent choice for your pet’s diet. Boiled chicken, brown rice or pasta and spinach, sweet potatoes and carrots can be very healthy for him.

Chop it up and add it into the dry kibble a couple of times a week. Its providing him with some variety from the dry kibble and gives him a tasty treat.

Some raw meat added in occasionally will also ensure his coat and eyes remain bright and vibrant. Always make sure he has access to fresh, cool water.

Diet:

The German Pinscher, because he is a muscular, energetic dog, should be fed a high-quality dog food that suits his size and his energy levels. If you feed him one of the commercially manufactured dog foods, make sure of the ingredients, as you don’t want food that is full of fillers, colorants and preservatives.

Choose high quality foods and sometimes mix in your own home cooked brown rice, vegetables and chicken. Adding in some raw meat occasionally will enhance his health too and help him towards staving off common dog illnesses. He should always have access to fresh, cool water.

Exercise:

He is a high energy dog and will require hectic exercise such as ball- and rope-pulling games, hikes, swimming and walks every day.

Grooming:

His short, smooth coat will require brushing twice a week to remove loose hairs and help it to maintain that sleek, glossy look.

Remember to check his ears for wax and dirt build up as well as for ear hematomas. These swellings inside your dogs ear can also be as a result of something stuck inside your dog’s ear or from your dog scratching his ear because of mites.

Characteristics

porcelaine dogsThe Porcelaine is a working, hunting dog but he is more than willing to become a companion animal, being loving and loyal to his human family.

He is a balanced, kind natured dog and can get on well with children and with pets in the home.

He enjoys his human family, and typical of hounds he is friendly, energetic and amusing. Bring this beautiful white dog into your home and start a wonderful, long, loving friendship with him.

The German Pinscher is a working dog bounding in energy. He just loves being involved with all the activities of his human family.

He is playful and assertive and will require a firm, balanced owner who is consistent with the rules laid down for the dog. It will be more than worthwhile having him trained and socialized as he becomes obedient, loyal and devoted.

He is intelligent and quick to learn and it simply turns him into a splendid pet. Add him to your family, and you’ll feel as though you’ve added a wonderful dimension to your home.

Comparison with other breeds

  1. Sakhalin Husky vs Porcelaine - Breed Comparison
  2. Portuguese Water Dog vs Porcelaine - Breed Comparison
  3. Puli vs Porcelaine - Breed Comparison
  4. Porcelaine vs American Bulldog - Breed Comparison
  5. Porcelaine vs Border Collie - Breed Comparison
  6. Porcelaine vs Alaskan Husky - Breed Comparison
  7. Porcelaine vs Catahoula Leopard - Breed Comparison
  8. Porcelaine vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  9. Porcelaine vs Aidi - Breed Comparison
  10. Porcelaine vs Griffon Bleu de Gascogne - Breed Comparison
  11. Porcelaine vs Borador - Breed Comparison
  12. Porcelaine vs German Spaniel - Breed Comparison
  13. Porcelaine vs Canadian Eskimo Dog - Breed Comparison
  14. Porcelaine vs McNab - Breed Comparison
  15. Porcelaine vs Finnish Lapphund - Breed Comparison
  16. Porcelaine vs Berger Blanc Suisse - Breed Comparison
  17. Porcelaine vs Griffon Nivernais - Breed Comparison
  18. Porcelaine vs Hokkaido - Breed Comparison
  19. Porcelaine vs Petit Bleu de Gascogne - Breed Comparison
  20. Porcelaine vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  21. Porcelaine vs Griffon Fauve de Bretagne - Breed Comparison
  22. Porcelaine vs Basque Shepherd - Breed Comparison
  23. Porcelaine vs Istrian Sheepdog - Breed Comparison
  24. Porcelaine vs Jamthund - Breed Comparison
  25. Porcelaine vs Karelian Bear Dog - Breed Comparison
  26. Sakhalin Husky vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  27. German Pinscher vs American Bulldog - Breed Comparison
  28. German Pinscher vs Border Collie - Breed Comparison
  29. German Pinscher vs Alaskan Husky - Breed Comparison
  30. German Pinscher vs Catahoula Leopard - Breed Comparison
  31. German Pinscher vs Aidi - Breed Comparison
  32. German Pinscher vs Borador - Breed Comparison
  33. German Pinscher vs Canadian Eskimo Dog - Breed Comparison
  34. German Pinscher vs Finnish Lapphund - Breed Comparison
  35. German Pinscher vs Berger Blanc Suisse - Breed Comparison
  36. German Pinscher vs Australian Kelpie - Breed Comparison
  37. German Pinscher vs Basque Shepherd - Breed Comparison
  38. German Pinscher vs Canaan Dog - Breed Comparison
  39. Portuguese Water Dog vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  40. Puli vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  41. Griffon Bleu de Gascogne vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  42. German Spaniel vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  43. McNab vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  44. Griffon Nivernais vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  45. Hokkaido vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  46. Petit Bleu de Gascogne vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  47. Pumi vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  48. Griffon Fauve de Bretagne vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison
  49. Istrian Sheepdog vs German Pinscher - Breed Comparison

Popular Dog Breeds